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Study of Registration Practices of the
ONTARIO COLLEGE OF TEACHERS, 2007

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION
  2. 2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Legislation
    2. b. Protected Titles
    3. c. Definition of the Profession
    4. d. Labour Market/Economic Trends
    5. e. New Developments Within the Profession
    6. f. Staffing
  3. 3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES
    1. a. Registration Requirements and Application Process
    2. b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals
    3. c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)
    4. d. Academic/Program Requirements
    5. e. Work Experience Requirements
    6. f. Examinations
    7. g. Language Requirements
    8. h. Fees
    9. i. Third Parties
    10. j. Typical Length of the Registration Process
    11. k. Accredited Programs
    12. l. Internal Review/Appeal Process
  4. 4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS
  5. 5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS
  6. 6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Nature and Frequency of Communication
    2. b. Backlogs
    3. c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process
  7. 7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY
  8. 8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS
  9. 9. SOURCES

ISBN 978-1-4249-6494-9 [HTML English version]


1. INTRODUCTION

The Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC) undertook a study of registration practices of Ontario's regulated professions during the fall and winter of 2007–2008. The purpose of the study was to understand each regulated profession's 2007 registration practices and to establish baseline data and information to enable the OFC to measure progress as it fulfills its mandate under the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006.

This report reflects the registration practices of the Ontario College of Teachers (OCT) as of December 31, 2007. Information in this report was gathered from:

The Ontario College of Teachers also provided registration information and statistics for 2005, 2006 and 2007 through a standard spreadsheet designed by the OFC.

An analysis and summary of the findings for all of the regulated professions is contained in the OFC's Ontario’s Regulated Professions: Report on the 2007 Study of Registration Practices.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY

a. Legislation

The Ontario College of Teachers (OCT) operates in accordance with the Ontario College of Teachers Act, 1996 and regulations made under this act.

b. Protected Titles

The OCT is the self-regulatory body for teachers in Ontario. To teach in Ontario's publicly funded schools, a teacher must be certified by the Ontario College of Teachers.

c. Definition of the Profession

The Education Act, 1990 defines a “teacher” as a member of the OCT.

Teachers are responsible for:

Principals are responsible for the organization and management of individual schools, including any budget assigned to the school by the school board. They are also responsible for the quality of instruction at their school and for student discipline. One or more vice-principals may also be assigned to the school to help the principal with his or her work.

d. Labour Market/Economic Trends

The following labour market information is from the Transition to Teaching 2007 report published by the OCT.

Many education graduates found it difficult to find their first Ontario teaching job in the 2006 – 07 school year. Only 41 per cent of the graduates of 2006 found regular employment by spring 2007. This low job-success rate was even worse than the 51 per cent rate experienced by new graduates the year before.

The province’s English-language teacher employment market is now highly competitive. New teachers compete for jobs with large numbers of surplus teachers, many of whom are still hoping to move from occasional to regular teaching jobs one, two or even three years after graduation. Many first-year teachers say there is substantial competition for longer term, more substantial occasional assignments. They report that they find many recently retired teachers in this job market.

A large decline in annual teacher retirements, along with substantial increases in new teachers, generated a significant imbalance in teacher supply and demand. With expansion of Ontario teacher education capacity (a 28 per cent increase since 2000), increased US border college recruitment of Ontarians to programs designed for the Ontario market (up 200 per cent) and strong growth in annual intake of teachers educated in other countries (up 175 per cent), the employment market balance at the beginning of the decade had changed to a significant oversupply of teachers.

Most of Ontario’s new French-language education graduates continue to find regular employment easily and early in their careers. The Transition to Teaching survey of the graduating class of 2006 found that fully 96 per cent of them had teaching jobs in the 2006–07 school year.

The OCT has certified record numbers of internationally educated teachers in recent years, but most new teachers who are not originally from Canada face unemployment or significant underemployment. Despite often substantial teaching experience in other countries, very few internationally educated teachers find jobs in Ontario school boards in today’s competitive teacher employment market.

e. New Developments Within the Profession

The OCT has made it a priority to review its registration practices, particularly as new developments in the field of education emerge. The OCT completed an extensive province-wide consultation on its registration practices and appeal process in the fall of 2007. In February and March 2008, it conducted the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition Policy Framework Consultation across the province with stakeholders, OCT members and agencies serving internationally educated teachers.

The OCT has become an associate member of the Canadian Network of the National Associations of Regulators (CNNAR). CNNAR strives to:

f. Staffing

The OCT has 163 full-time employees.

Of these, 59 Membership Services employees are involved in the registration process. The registration appeals process involves five full-time employees who work part-time on appeals in addition to other duties.

There is a clear distinction between the roles of the Registrar and Deputy Registrar. The Registrar is responsible for the issuing of certificates and never becomes involved in the appeals process. The Deputy Registrar is responsible for the registration appeals process.

3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES

a. Registration Requirements and Application Process

An “applicant” is defined as an individual who submits an application for certification and pays the application fee.

i. Basic Requirements for Registration

To teach general studies in the publicly funded school system in Ontario, an applicant must submit evidence that he or she has successfully completed both:

To teach technological studies, an applicant must have a secondary school diploma equivalent to the Ontario secondary school graduation diploma, have successfully completed a teacher education program and provide proof of wage-earning experience and competency in the technological study area the applicant is trained to teach.

ii. Classes of Registration

Once applicants have satisfied the basic requirements for certification, the OCT issues Ontario applicants a Certificate of Qualification and out-of-province applicants an Interim Certificate of Qualification. Both certificates are licences to teach in Ontario.

iii. Steps in the Application Process

Step 1 – Initial Application

Applicants submit a completed application form, proof of identity, a criminal record check[1] and a copy of any teaching certificates they have received from other jurisdictions. The OCT sets up a file and prepares a letter to the applicant listing any outstanding documents. The following documents must be sent to the OCT from the official source:

Step 2 – Evaluation of Credentials

Out-of-province applicants’ qualifications are evaluated within four to six weeks once all the required documents have been received by the OCT. The OCT determines if the credentials meet Ontario’s standards for teachers, and then either issues a certificate or identifies steps that the applicant will have to take in order to become certified. The OCT invites applicants to their offices to find out more information, including appeal processes if the individual was not eligible to be certified.

Step 3 – Certificate of Qualification and Interim Certificate of Qualification

Ontario Graduates: The OCT issues a Certificate of Qualification to applicants who have completed an Ontario teacher education program. This is a licence to teach in Ontario’s publicly funded schools. Members must remain in good standing with the OCT.

Graduates from Outside Ontario: When an applicant who completed his or her teacher education outside of Ontario satisfies the evaluation requirements, the OCT will grant the applicant an Interim Certificate of Qualification, which is a licence to teach in Ontario’s publicly funded schools. This certificate is a temporary document that lists degrees, programs of teacher education and qualifications. It is valid for up to six years, if applicants maintain it by paying their annual membership fee. Conditions may be placed on the certificate that applicants must satisfy before they can request a conversion to a permanent certificate. This interim certificate allows applicants to work and accumulate the equivalent of 194 days of successful teaching experience, which is required for permanent certification in Ontario.

A New Teacher Induction Program created by the Ministry of Education and delivered by school boards provides support that includes mentoring for newly certified teachers in full-time positions. Once applicants have successfully completed the New Teacher Induction Program, a notation is added to the teaching certificate. (This designation is not required for full certification.)

Converting an Interim Certificate of Qualification to a Certificate of Qualification: When interim certificate holders have accumulated 194 days of successful teaching experience in Ontario, and complied with any other conditions on their interim certificate, they may apply to convert their Interim Certificate of Qualification to a Certificate of Qualification. The Certificate of Qualification is issued annually as a licence to teach in Ontario, and members must remain in good standing with the OCT.

iv. Process for Applicants’ Request of Personal Information

The OCT has a Request for Personal Information process that enables applicants to get a copy of their file, including third-party documents, at any stage in the application process.

b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals

i. Standard Documentation

An applicant must provide the OCT with several documents, including some from the country where they completed their education, if applicable. The applicant must also arrange official translations for any document that is in a language other than English or French.

The following documents must be submitted to the OCT:

Applicants must also contact their educational institutions and licensing authorities and ask them to send the following original documents directly to the OCT:

Teachers of technological studies must also submit these documents:

The application will be valid for two years. If, at the end of that time, the OCT has not received all of the documents needed to evaluate the application, the process ends and the applicant will receive a notice in writing that his or her file will be closed. The applicant may also request additional time. If the applicant chooses to reapply, he or she will have to pay the application fee again and meet all requirements.

ii. Options for Applicants with Unavailable/Destroyed Documents

An applicant may be unable to obtain academic records due to political unrest. In this case, the applicant should contact the OCT’s Client Services to discuss his or her situation. The applicant will be required to submit proof of attempts to obtain the required documents, as well as copies of any academic documents that he or she may have. The OCT may intervene on applicants’ behalf when they provide proof that they are unable to obtain required documentation. In exceptional circumstances, the OCT will also consider alternative documents such as affidavits on a case-by-case basis.

c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)

Once non-Ontario applicants submit their complete application package and all the required documents are received, the OCT will evaluate the courses of study to determine if the applicants’ credentials meet Ontario standards for teachers. This may take four to six weeks, or even longer if further clarification of the applicant’s studies is required. The OCT will notify applicants by letter about one of following outcomes:

  1. The application has been accepted.

  2. OCT requires more information: OCT will write to applicants for more information or clarification or write to the post-secondary institution.

  3. The application has not been accepted.

The letter sent to applicants includes information about any requirements that they must fulfill. The OCT also provides an applicant with a credential brochure that offers a number of resources to help clarify these requirements. Applicants have two years to complete them. (Note: applicants are also informed that requirements for certification may change.) After two years, the assessment of qualifications is no longer valid, and applicants must reapply to the OCT and begin the registration process again.

If an application is not accepted (outcome 3, above), the applicant has the right to appeal the decision.

Applicants for membership in the OCT may not be accepted for any of the following reasons:

A teacher education program may not satisfy Ontario’s requirements for any of the following reasons:

The OCT has six evaluators, none of whom are members of the profession. They receive ongoing training to carry out assessments each year. The Manager of Evaluation Services is a member of the profession.

d. Academic/Program Requirements

i. Teachers of General Studies

Applicants who want to become registered as teachers of general studies must meet the following academic requirements.

An Acceptable Post-secondary Degree

The applicant’s degree must be from a post-secondary institution that is accredited in the jurisdiction where the institution is located.

Graduation from a Valid Teacher Education Program

The applicant’s education as a teacher must have been completed at the post-secondary level. The program must certify/authorize applicants to teach in schools operated for the public in the country, province or state where the applicant completed it. The year of study must contain the following:

ii. Teachers of Technological Studies

Technological studies teachers are not required to have a degree. Applicants must prove that they meet the following requirements:

The technological studies subject areas include the following:

e. Work Experience Requirements

i. Teachers of General Studies

There is no work experience requirement for registration. However, an acceptable teacher education program must include a minimum of 40 days of supervised practice teaching. For those educated outside Ontario, the OCT will consider teaching experience after certification in another jurisdiction as a substitute for supervised practice teaching.

ii. Teachers of Technological Studies

Applicants who are applying to teach technological studies must have five years of related wage-earning, business or industrial experience in the area(s) of technological studies covered by the teacher education program.

Note:

f. Examinations

There are no entry-to-practice examinations.

g. Language Requirements

There are four ways to satisfy the language requirement for registration, described in the following four sub-sections.

i. Teacher Education Completed in English

Applicants who have completed a teacher education program in English in one of the following countries satisfy the requirement for English and do not have to send proof of language proficiency:

Anguilla

Cayman Islands

St.Vincent

Antigua and Barbuda

Dominica

Seychelles

Australia

Ghana

Sierra Leone

Bahamas

Grenada

Trinidad and Tobago

Barbados

Guyana

Turks and Caicos Islands

Belize

Jamaica

United Kingdom

Benin

Montserrat

Uganda

Bermuda

Nigeria

United States

Botswana

New Zealand

US Virgin Islands

British Virgin Islands

Republic of Ireland

Zambia

Cameroon

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Zimbabwe

Canada

St. Lucia

 

ii. Teacher Education Completed in French

Applicants who have completed a teacher education program in French in one of the following countries satisfy the requirement for French and do not have to send proof of language proficiency:

Benin

Guinea

Canada

Haiti

Cameroon

Ivory Coast

Congo — Democratic Republic

Luxembourg

Congo — Republic

Mali

France

Monaco

French Guyana

Senegal

Guadeloupe

Seychelles

iii. Completion of English or French Education in Another Country

If an applicant completed any one of the following three parts of his or her education in English or French in a country other than those specified in sections i and ii above, then that satisfies the requirement for English or French:

  1. elementary education

  2. secondary and post-secondary education

  3. teacher education

The applicant must arrange for the educational institution to send a letter directly to the OCT confirming that the language of instruction was English or French at the time the applicant attended the institution.

iv. Achievement of Acceptable Test Scores on a Language Proficiency Test

Applicants may also demonstrate language fluency by submitting acceptable scores from one of the following three tests. Applicants are responsible for the cost of the language proficiency test. Test costs may vary.

Test of English as a Foreign Language, Internet-based Test (TOEFL iBT)

This is a single integrated Internet-only test provided by the Education Testing Service (ETS). The OCT requires an overall score of 103 on this test, with scores of at least 23 in listening, 24 in reading, 28 in writing and 28 in speaking.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS) (academic test only)

The OCT requires proof of an overall score of at least 7 on the IELTS (academic test only), with scores of at least 6.5 in reading and listening and scores of at least 7 in writing and speaking.

Test pour étudiants et stagiaires au Canada (TESTCan)

The OCT requires minimum scores of 5 in writing, 5 in reading, 5 in listening and 4.5 in speaking.

h. Fees[2]

Evaluation fee (non-refundable)[3]

$222

Registration fee (non-refundable)

$123

Annual membership fee (paid after the application has been completed)

$104

Fee for an appeal

$99

i. Third Parties

Name of Third Party Relationship to Regulatory Body

Ontario district school boards, school authorities and private schools

Provide required teaching experience.

Ontario faculties of education

Offer a variety of additional qualification courses.

Teach in Ontario

Provides employment preparation resources to internationally trained teachers.

Education Testing Service (ETS)

Administers English language proficiency test.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

Administers English language proficiency test.

TESTCan

Administers French language proficiency test.

j. Typical Length of the Registration Process

Once the OCT has received all the required documentation, the registration process takes four to six weeks. The time that it takes for applicants’ documents to reach the OCT depends on where the documents are coming from.

k. Accredited Programs

The OCT only accredits programs in Ontario. Applicants who completed programs outside Ontario must go through the OCT’s credential assessment process.

The following institutions in Ontario offer teacher education programs accredited by the OCT.

l. Internal Review/Appeal Process

When an evaluation of an application has been completed:

If the Evaluation Services Unit Review Committee recommends refusal of an application, the Registrar reviews the file, and decides whether to support the recommendation.

If the Registrar denies certification, the applicant may appeal. Information about the appeals process is available on the OCT’s website. The basic steps are discussed below.

i. Initiating an Appeal

To initiate an appeal of the Registrar’s decision to deny certification, the applicant submits a written request to the Registration Appeals Committee.

The applicant’s physical file and the appeal process and administration are taken over by the Policy Unit in Corporate and Council Services under the direction of the Deputy Registrar. This unit supports the work of the Registration Appeals Committee.

The functions of the Registration Appeals Committee are clearly defined in the Ontario College of Teachers Act, 1996, and the OCT communicates with the applicant at every stage.

The Registration Appeals Committee is a statutory committee of the governing council. It is composed of three elected members who are certified teachers in Ontario, and two appointed members (not members of the profession) appointed by the government. All five are members of the OCT council.

ii. Responding to the Request for Appeal

Within 10 days of receiving the applicant’s request for an appeal, the OCT sends the applicant an appeals package, which includes copies of the documents the Registrar used to determine the denial of certification. At this point, the applicant may provide further written submissions.

Copies of the applicant’s file are sent to the committee members before the appeal meeting. During the meeting, the Director of Membership Services makes a presentation on the documents that supported the recommendation of the Evaluation Services Unit and the Registrar’s decision. The Policy Unit’s Policy Analyst presents any additional information provided by the applicant.

iii. Notifying the Applicant of the Appeal Decision

All decisions are provided in writing to the applicant. In most cases, a decision is rendered within 120 days from the date of appeal.

4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS

The Teach in Ontario program is in its fourth year, and includes OCT, teachers federations and immigrant-serving agencies. This program had three initial objectives:

  1. To ensure more information is available to applicants

  2. To provide language upgrading

  3. To offer a six-week program through local agencies.

The program is now focusing less on supporting applicants in obtaining licensure and more on helping them obtain teaching employment in Ontario.

The program now includes a segment on classroom observation. It is also piloting a new orientation program for teaching in Ontario, to support job readiness for new teachers.

5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS

Since 1999 there has been a mutual recognition agreement (MRA) in principle between all the Canadian provinces. The MRA is scheduled to be signed by the end of 2008 and to be in force in April 2009.

6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY

a. Nature and Frequency of Communication

The OCT’s contact with applicants is individualized and can be daily in some cases. Contact methods include outgoing communication, letters, call centre contact, e-mail, telephone and an information counter for walk-in inquiries.

On a typical day, the information counter services 60 to 80 visitors, most of whom are internationally educated teachers asking for a review of their documentation. Of all calls received by the call centre, 50 to 60 per cent are from internationally trained individuals.

The OCT also hosts monthly sessions on the following:

b. Backlogs

There is no backlog in the registration process. It takes only 10 days to set up a file, the OCT certifies applicants year-round and there are no cyclical increases in applications from internationally trained applicants.

c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process

The first point of contact for a dissatisfied applicant is the call centre. Issues that cannot be resolved at that point are escalated to the Director of Membership Services, then the Deputy Registrar or Registrar. Applicants can request an in-person meeting and can contact the OCT in writing or by phone.

7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY

The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration conducted a survey in 2005 to collect information about occupational regulatory bodies in Ontario.

In 2007 the OCT implemented a policy change regarding teacher education programs that have been delivered in part via distance education. The OCT will recognize up to 60 per cent of a program completed via distance education, and requires that two additional basic qualification courses be completed in-classroom. The OCT has contacted applicants who were refused under the previous policy up to two years earlier, to enable them to reopen their files.

The OCT has recently reviewed registration practices for compliance with the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006.

8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS

Definitions used in these tables:

Alternative class of licence: a class of licence that enables its holder to practise with limitations; additional registration requirements must be met in order to be fully licensed. Alternative classes of licence granted by the Ontario College of Teachers are specified under the tables below.

Applicant: a person who has applied to start the process for entry to the profession.

Applicant actively pursuing licensing: an applicant whose application is still in progress.

Inactive applicant: an applicant who had no contact with the Ontario College of Teachers within the year specified. The OCT does not track this information.

Member: a person who is currently able to teach in Ontario's publicly funded schools.

Languages in which application information materials were available
Language 2005 2006 2007
English

Yes

Yes

Yes

French

Yes

Yes

Yes

Other(s)

 

 

 

Countries where internationally educated applicants were initially trained in teaching
Applications received1 2005 2006 2007
Largest number

Australia

Australia

Australia

Second-largest number

India

India

India

Third-largest number

Scotland

New Zealand

New Zealand

Fourth-largest number

New Zealand

England

Scotland

Fifth-largest number

England

Scotland

England

1Does not include the United States.

Staff employed by the Ontario College of Teachers
Number of staff 2005 2006 2007
Involved in registration process

53

53

59

Involved in appeals process

5

0

5

Jurisdiction1 where members were initially trained in teaching (before they were certified by the Ontario College of Teachers to teach in publicly funded schools in Ontario)
Members Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL2
Total members

70,712

4,593

10,330

9,964

212,739

Non-practising members3

6,180

802

304

407

161,171

1 “Jurisdiction” reflects the country where the member was originally educated to teach — even if he or she completed a teacher education program in Ontario.

2 All numbers in the total column include members whose original teacher training occurred in an unknown jurisdiction.

3 Members with a status of “retired” or “suspended — non-payment of fees” as of December 31, 2007

Applicants processed by the Ontario College of Teachers in 2005

 

Jurisdiction1 where members were initially trained in teaching (before they were certified by the Ontario College of Teachers to teach in publicly funded schools in Ontario)
In 2005 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL2
New applications received

8,580

565

1,825

1,921

12,929

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

9,671

1,118

2,601

4,200

17,838

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

54

18

23

95

Applicants who became members

8,110

563

1,654

1,568

11,996

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3

104

563

1,654

1,568

3,917

1 “Jurisdiction” reflects the country where the member was originally educated to teach — even if he or she completed a teacher education program in Ontario.

2 All numbers in the total column include applicants whose original teacher training occurred in an unknown jurisdiction.

3 Certificate of Qualification (Limited), Certificate of Qualification (Limited, Restricted), Interim Certification of Qualification and Interim Certification of Qualification (Limited). The interim certificates are temporary licences.

Applicants processed by the Ontario College of Teachers in 2006

 

Jurisdiction1 where members were initially trained in teaching (before they were certified by the Ontario College of Teachers to teach in publicly funded schools in Ontario)
In 2006 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL2
New applications received

9,213

545

1,967

1,967

13,720

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

10,765

1,085

2,899

4,263

19,277

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

39

39

30

108

Applicants who became members

8,435

460

1,893

1,466

12,356

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3

171

460

1,893

1,466

4,063

1 “Jurisdiction” reflects the country where the member was originally educated to teach — even if he or she completed a teacher education program in Ontario.

2 All numbers in the total column include applicants whose original teacher training occurred in an unknown jurisdiction.

3 Certificate of Qualification (Limited), Certificate of Qualification (Limited, Restricted), Interim Certification of Qualification and Interim Certification of Qualification (Limited). The interim certificates are temporary licences.

Applicants processed by the Ontario College of Teachers in 2007

 

Jurisdiction1 where members were initially trained in teaching (before they were certified by the Ontario College of Teachers to teach in publicly funded schools in Ontario)

In 2007 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL2
New applications received

8,072

490

1,794

1,908

12,801

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

10,397

1,111

2,803

4,563

19,659

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

106

166

238

515

Applicants who became members

8,626

489

1,754

1,440

12,404

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3

155

489

1,754

1,440

3,878

1 “Jurisdiction” reflects the country where the member was originally educated to teach — even if he or she completed a teacher education program in Ontario.

2 All numbers in the total column include applicants whose original teacher training occurred in an unknown jurisdiction.

3 Certificate of Qualification (Limited), Certificate of Qualification (Limited, Restricted), Interim Certification of Qualification and Interim Certification of Qualification (Limited). The interim certificates are temporary licences.

9. SOURCES

Ontario College of Teachers. Transition to Teaching 2007. http://www.oct.ca/publications/PDF/transitions07_e.pdf. Last accessed: March 10, 2007.

Ontario College of Teachers and Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. “Access to the Teaching Profession in Ontario.” Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration website. http://www.citizenship.gov.on.ca. Last accessed: December 12, 2007.

Ontario College of Teachers website. http://www.oct.ca. Last accessed: March 3, 2008.

Representatives of the Ontario College of Teachers met with staff of the Office of the Fairness Commissioner on January 11, 2008, to provide further information for this study.



[1] Applicants may obtain a criminal record check report from their local, regional or provincial police service in Canada. The original signed report must not be older than six months from the date the OCT receives it. The report must list all names that applicants have ever used.

[2] All fees shown include applicable taxes.

[3] Ontario graduates do not pay the evaluation fee, because they are from accredited schools.