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Study of Registration Practices of the
ONTARIO COLLEGE OF SOCIAL WORKERS AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORKERS, 2007

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION
  2. 2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Legislation
    2. b. Protected Titles
    3. c. Definition of the Profession
    4. d. Labour Market/Economic Trends
    5. e. New Developments Within the Profession
    6. f. Staffing
  3. 3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES
    1. a. Registration Requirements and Application Process
    2. b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals
    3. c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)
    4. d. Academic/Program Requirements
    5. e. Work Experience Requirements
    6. f. Examinations
    7. g. Language Requirements
    8. h. Fees
    9. i. Third Parties
    10. j. Typical Length of the Registration Process
    11. k. Accredited Programs
    12. l. Internal Review/Appeal Process
  4. 4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS
  5. 5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS
  6. 6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Nature and Frequency of Communication
    2. b. Backlogs
    3. c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process
  7. 7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY
  8. 8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS
  9. 9. SOURCES

ISBN 978-1-4249-6492-5 [HTML English version]


1. INTRODUCTION

The Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC) undertook a study of registration practices of Ontario's regulated professions during the fall and winter of 2007–2008. The purpose of the study was to understand each regulated profession's 2007 registration practices, and to establish baseline data and information to enable the OFC to measure progress as it fulfills its mandate under the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006.

This report reflects the registration practices of the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers as of December 31, 2007. Information in this report was gathered from

The Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers also provided registration information and statistics for 2005, 2006 and 2007 through a standard spreadsheet designed by the OFC.

An analysis and summary of the findings for all of the regulated professions are contained in the OFC's Ontario’s Regulated Professions: Report of the 2007 Study of Registration Practices.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY

a. Legislation

The Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers (OCSWSSW) operates in accordance with the Social Work and Social Service Work Act, 1998, the regulations made under the act and the by-laws approved by Council of the college.

b. Protected Titles

Individuals must be registered with the college to use the titles “social worker,” registered social worker,” “social service worker” or “registered social service worker.” The Social Work and Social Service Work Act also prohibits individuals from holding out explicitly or by implication that they are social workers or social service workers if they are not members of the college.

c. Definition of the Profession

Social work is a profession concerned with helping individuals, families, groups and communities to enhance their individual and collective well-being. Its goal is to help people resolve problems by developing their skills and their ability to use their own resources and those of the community. Social work is concerned with individual and personal problems and with broader social issues such as poverty, unemployment, domestic violence, human rights and social justice.

According to the college's Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, the scope of practice of the profession of social work encompasses the assessment, diagnosis, treatment and evaluation of individual, interpersonal and societal problems through the use of social work knowledge, skills, interventions and strategies, to assist individuals, dyads, families, groups, organizations and communities to achieve optimum psychosocial and social functioning and includes the following:

  1. provision of assessment, diagnostic, treatment and evaluation services within a relationship between a social worker and a client

  2. development, promotion, management, administration, delivery and evaluation of human service programs, including those done in collaboration with other professionals

  3. provision of professional supervision to a social worker, social work student or other supervisee

  4. provision of consultation services to other social workers or professionals in relation to the activities described in paragraph (i) above

  5. development, promotion, implementation and evaluation of social policies aimed at improving social conditions and equality

  6. conduct of research or provision of education regarding the practice of social work, as defined in paragraphs (i) to (v) above and (vii) below

  7. any other activities recognized by the college.

Social service workers administer and implement a variety of social assistance programs and community services, and assist clients to deal with personal and social problems. They assess the needs and resources of individuals, families, groups and communities and assist them to achieve their goals and meet their needs. Social service work is also concerned with social policy and with cultural and economic systems as they impact clients.

According to the college's Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, the scope of practice of the profession of social service work means the assessment, treatment and evaluation of individual, interpersonal and societal problems through the use of social service work knowledge, skills, interventions and strategies, to assist individuals, dyads, families, groups, organizations and communities to achieve optimum social functioning. It also includes the following:

  1. provision of assessment, treatment and evaluation services within a relationship between a social service worker and a client

  2. development, promotion, management, administration, delivery and evaluation of human service programs, including those done in collaboration with other professionals

  3. provision of professional supervision to a social service worker, social service work student or other supervisee

  4. provision of consultation services to other social service workers or professionals engaged in the activities described in paragraph (i) above

  5. development, promotion, implementation and evaluation of social policies aimed at improving social conditions and equality

  6. conduct of research or provision of education regarding the practice of social service work, as defined in paragraphs (i) to (v) above and (vii) below

  7. any other activities recognized by the college.

d. Labour Market/Economic Trends

Social workers are employed in family service agencies, children’s aid societies, hospitals, school boards, correctional institutions, welfare administration agencies, child welfare agencies, community-based health care agencies, employee assistance programs, addiction services and government departments. Some are self-employed in private practice.

Employment opportunities for social workers are expected to remain good through 2009, particularly for those with advanced degrees in social work and experience in fields such as geriatrics, alcohol and substance abuse, health and mental health, and child welfare. Palliative care is also a growing area, as is counselling for those social workers with an academic specialization in this area. Progression to other related careers in social service, such as family and marriage counsellors and probation and parole officers, is possible with additional training and/or experience.

Social service workers are employed in federal, provincial and municipal governments, health and social service agencies, including group homes and institutional health and social service firms. Employment for this occupation is expected to increase more rapidly than the average for all occupations through 2009. The conditions can be challenging. Social service workers usually work in clinical, office or community settings, such as community mental health and addictions clinics. Their clients include addicts, troubled individuals or families, abused women and the poor.

Most social workers and social service workers are employed in the health or social service sectors, and these are usually dependent on government funding. Only a small percentage work in independent practice. Both professions would be negatively affected by an economic downturn or government cutbacks; however, unemployment is currently not a major concern. There may be a shortage of professionals in the future, as the college’s membership is aging, and a high percentage are expected to retire over the next 20 years.

e. New Developments Within the Profession

The most significant change resulting from the changes brought about by the Health System Improvements Act, 2007 (Bill 171)is Schedule R, which amends the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 by adding a new controlled act of psychotherapy and authorizing members of the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers to perform the controlled act in compliance with the Social Work and Social Service Work Act, 1998, its regulations and by-laws.

f. Staffing

The OCSWSSW employs 24 regular full-time staff, 2.5 contract/project staff, and three or four temporary staff during the annual membership renewal. Of the total staff group, six regular staff are involved in the registration process, along with the 2.5 contract/project staff. Two registration staff support the Registration Appeals Committee.

3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES

a. Registration Requirements and Application Process

i. Requirements for Social Workers

The academic requirements for registration as a social worker are:

or

or

or

The college’s requirements for professional conduct for social workers are:

Applicants must also:

ii. Requirements for Social Service Workers

The academic requirements for registration as a social service worker are:

or

or

or

The college’s requirements for professional conduct for social service workers are:

Applicants must also:

The steps in the registration process are:

b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals

In addition to the requirements specified in section 3.a, internationally trained social workers and social service workers must provide:

Applicants may have to demonstrate their proficiency in English or French by achieving certain language test scores.

ii. Options for Applicants with Unavailable/Destroyed Documents

The OCSWSSW does not have a policy regarding applicants without access to documents.

The CASW evaluates the academic credentials of internationally trained/educated social work applicants, and is typically the organization to which applicants submit their academic credentials.

c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)

Two policies regarding social work academic credentials obtained outside Canada have been approved by Council of the college:

The credentials of social service work applicants are reviewed by the college to determine whether the program is equivalent to a diploma in social service work from a college of applied arts and technology in Ontario.

Applicants need the following documents (originals) for the CASW’s academic credential evaluation process:

Applicants must also submit photocopies (in English or French) of:

d. Academic/Program Requirements

i. Requirements for Social Workers

The CASW determines degree equivalency based on the following criteria.

Social workers in Ontario are university graduates of a social work program accredited by the CASWE. They have achieved an undergraduate bachelor of social work degree (BSW), which takes four years, or a master of social work degree (MSW), which takes one or two years after the completion of a bachelor degree, or both.

The BSW is usually a four-year undergraduate program that includes courses in the humanities and the natural and social sciences, social work professional courses and field practice. The general requirement is a minimum of 60 credits in the following areas: social work intervention methods, social policy, field of practice and social problems, research methods and field work (a minimum of 700 hours). A BSW graduate is expected to achieve “a level of competence adequate for undertaking initial responsibility in general practice.”

The MSW is either a one-year graduate program following the BSW or a two-year graduate program that admits candidates who hold general arts or other non-social work bachelor degrees. Field practice is an essential component of both models. Although a thesis, dissertation or research report is not an essential component, CASW takes it into consideration. Programs at the master’s level are intended to contribute to the preparation of graduates who possess an advanced level of competence with respect to a particular social problem area, professional service sector, social work methodology, professional role or function or in a combination of these.

The Council of the OCSWSSW has also approved a policy that sets out the criteria by which the Registrar will determine whether an individual applying for registration as a social worker has a combination of academic qualifications and practical experience substantially equivalent to a degree in social work from a social work program accredited by the CASWE.

ii. Requirements for Social Service Workers

Social service workers in Ontario have achieved a diploma in social service work from a college of applied arts and technology (CAAT) in Ontario, or have graduated from a program at a CAAT in Ontario that is not a social service work program but has been approved by the Council of the college to be equivalent to a social service work diploma from a CAAT, or have graduated from a program outside of Ontario that has been approved by the Council of the college to be equivalent to a social service work program from a CAAT.

The Council has also approved a policy that sets out the criteria by which the Registrar will determine whether an individual applying for registration has a combination of academic qualifications and practical experience substantially equivalent to a diploma in social service work from a CAAT in Ontario.

e. Work Experience Requirements

Work experience is not an entry-to-practice requirement for registration with the OCSWSSW for applicants who possess one of the following: a social work degree from a CASW-evaluated accredited social work program; a diploma in social service work from a program offered in Ontario; or a program approved by Council of the college as equivalent to a social service work program offered in Ontario.

Applicants who do not have a social work degree or a diploma in social service work may apply to the college on the basis of having a combination of academic qualifications and practical experience. It is the Registrar’s determination whether their combination of academic qualifications and practical experience is substantially equivalent to a social work degree accredited by the CASWE or to a diploma in social service work in Ontario.

f. Examinations

There are no examinations required to register with OCSWSSW as either a social worker or social service worker at this time. The Council of the college has approved entry-to-practice examinations for both professions in the future. The timeframe for implementation has not yet been determined.

g. Language Requirements

All applicants demonstrate language proficiency either by indicating on the application form that English or French is their primary language of communication, or is the language in which they completed their social work or social service work education, or is the language in which they principally and currently practice the profession. Applicants who do not indicate that they meet all of these criteria must demonstrate language fluency by submitting language scores assessed no earlier than two years prior to the date the application is received by the college. The following language tests are accepted by the college:

h. Fees

Unless otherwise indicated, all fees are in Canadian dollars and exclude the GST.

Fee Cost
CASW evaluation of accreditation1 $250 (GST incl)
Application fee $75
Annual fee2 $340

Registration fee for new graduates,
including IESW graduates3

$240
Annual fee for new graduates4 $240
Late payment fee $50
Tuition costs Ryerson IESW program 5 $4,000

1 Payable to CASW.

2 Prorated quarterly based on the date when the certificate of registration is issued. A refund of the prorated registration fee is issued, if applicable, when the certificate of registration is issued.

3 Applies to new graduates who apply for registration on or before December 31 of the year in which they graduate from a social work or social service work program. The registration fee is prorated quarterly based on the date when the certificate of registration is issued. A refund of the prorated registration fee, if applicable, is issued at the time the certificate of registration is issued.

4 In the two subsequent years of membership, provided that annual fee is paid prior to the date on which the late penalty payment is effective.

5 Payable to Ryerson University.

In addition to the expenses above, applicants may have to pay for:

i. Third Parties

Name of Third Party Relationship to Regulatory Body

Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW)

Assesses equivalency of non-North American social work academic qualifications

Ryerson University

Provides bridging program for internationally trained social workers.

Canadian Association for Social Work Education (CASWE)

Accredits Canadian degrees in social work

j. Typical Length of the Registration Process

For applicants who graduated with a social work degree or social service work diploma as set out in the registration regulation and registration policies, the OCSWSSW can process an application and notify the applicant of its decision within four weeks of receiving all required documents. The college will make every effort, once all required documents are received, to accede to the requests of applicants who ask that their applications be expedited.

The length of the registration process may be longer for applicants who are applying for registration with a combination of academic qualifications and practical experience (i.e., who were educated in a discipline other than social work or social service work).

The CASW’s evaluation of international social work academic credentials usually takes four to five weeks after receiving the fee and all required documentation.

k. Accredited Programs

i. Accredited Social Work Programs in Ontario

The following is a list of accredited bachelor of social work and master of social work programs in Ontario. Graduates who have obtained a degree in social work from these programs usually meet the academic requirement for registration as social workers with the college.

ii. Accredited Social Work Programs in Other Provinces

The following are social work programs in other provinces that are accredited by the CASWE:

Alberta
University of Calgary

British Columbia
Nicola Valley Institute of Technology, Merritt
Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops
University of British Columbia, Vancouver
University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna
University College of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford
University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George
University of Victoria

Manitoba
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg

New Brunswick
St. Thomas University, Fredericton
Université de Moncton

Newfoundland
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s

Nova Scotia
Dalhousie University, Halifax

Quebec
McGill University, Montreal
Université Laval, Quebec
Université de Montréal
Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda
Université du Québec à Chicoutimi
Université du Québec à Montréal
Université du Québec en Outaouais, Hull
Université de Sherbrooke

Saskatchewan
First Nations University of Canada, Saskatoon
University of Regina

iii. Accredited Social Service Work Programs in Ontario

The following approved social service work programs are offered in Ontario. Graduates who have obtained a diploma in social service work from these programs usually meet the education requirement for registration as social service workers with the college. At this time, there are four non-social service work programs approved by Council of the college as being equivalent to a social service work program offered in Ontario at a college of applied arts and technology. These programs are also listed below:

l. Appeal Process/Internal Review

i. Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers

If the Registrar of the college proposes to refuse to issue a Certificate of Registration, the applicant has 60 days from the receipt of the Registrar’s proposal to request that the Registration Appeals Committee review the Registrar’s proposal. If the applicant cannot make the request within 60 days, the committee might extend this deadline. However, the applicant must persuade the committee, in writing, that there are reasonable grounds for relief on the review and for extending the deadline.

It is advisable for the applicant to include a letter or documents explaining why he or she is requesting that the committee review the Registrar’s proposal to refuse to issue a Certificate of Registration. The committee bases its decision on the information provided in the letter, all the documents in the file, any documents submitted as part of the review and the unique circumstances of the review. The committee does not meet with applicants.

The Registration Appeals Committee provides the Registrar and the applicant with a written decision and reasons within 60 days after completing its review. A party to a proceeding before the committee may appeal its decision or order to Divisional Court.

The Registration Appeals Committee is one of the statutory committees created by the Social Work and Social Service Work Act. The membership of the committee is set out in the act, as are the dispositional powers of the committee.

There are two social workers and two social service workers (only one of the four can be a non-Council member) and two public members, for a total of six members on the Registration Appeals Committee.

No person who has been involved in the processing of applications or decisions made regarding applications is involved in the registration appeals decision.

Information about the Registration Appeals Committee is available on the OCSWSSW website.

ii. Canadian Association of Social Workers

Applicants whose academic qualifications are not granted equivalence to a Canadian social work degree by the Canadian Association of Social Workers can appeal this decision in writing to the President of CASW, within three months of being informed of the decision.

Applicants whose academic qualifications are judged by CASW to be equivalent to a Canadian BSW but who are seeking equivalency to a Canadian MSW can ask for a review of this decision in a letter to the Executive Director of the CASW within six months of being informed of CASW’s decision.

4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS

Internationally educated social workers can obtain a Certificate in Canadian Social Work Practice at the Internationally Educated Social Work Professionals (IESW) bridging program at Ryerson University’s G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, in Toronto.

This one-year program is not a requirement for working as a social worker in Ontario; rather, it provides an introduction to social services in Canada and includes training, mentorship, employment and career support, and supervised work placements for qualified social work professionals educated outside of Canada. Participants gain an overview of the structure of social services in Ontario, including current labour market skills and expectations; acquire employment experience and orientation to the Canadian workplace; and expand their network of social service employers and organizations.

The course starts each September and runs for one academic year. The application deadline is March 31 of the year in which the applicant wishes to start.

The admission requirements are:

or

In addition to its certificate program, the IESW bridging program coordinates a network of internationally educated social work professionals living in the Greater Toronto Area. Members receive regular e-mail bulletins with information about employment, and volunteer and professional development opportunities. Network meetings are held quarterly in different social work settings, and include discussions about social work practice and employment issues.

The IESW bridging program also provides individual support, information and referrals on academic and employment pathways.

In addition, Ryerson University offers a non-credit course (Introduction to Social Services in Ontario) that reflects the specific needs of internationally educated professionals who have experience in the social service field, and provides an orientation to social services in Ontario.

5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS

There is a mutual recognition agreement respecting registered social workers in Canada. The MRA was signed in 2007 by all provinces except Newfoundland and Labrador. Under the terms of the MRA, the majority of registered social workers in Canada will meet the registration requirements of the OCSWSSW.

There is no mutual recognition agreement for social service workers. Ontario is the only province in Canada that regulates social service workers.

There is no mutual recognition agreement between Ontario and any state in the United States. However, graduates from social work programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (the US social work accrediting body) meet the academic requirements for registration as social workers in Ontario.

6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY

a. Nature and Frequency of Communication

The College acknowledges by letter all applications it receives and issues letters to applicants whose applications are incomplete or lacking documentation. Applicants can also telephone, e-mail, fax or write to the College at any time.

b. Backlogs

There is no backlog of applications from applicants who have completed education/training in social work or social service work. However, there is some delay in processing the applications of those who completed training in a discipline other than social work or social service work.

c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process

The OCSWSSW deals with complaints on an individual basis, and these are initially handled by the Registration Department. If the complaint is more complex, the Deputy Registrar or Registrar may get involved. The majority of complaints are from applicants who have applied for registration on the basis of a combination of academic qualifications and practical experience ( i.e., their academic credentials are not in social work or social service work). Due to the complexity and unique nature of each application, these reviews are usually detailed and lengthy, resulting in a long waiting period before an applicant is informed in writing of the Registrar’s decision.

7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY

The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration conducted a survey in 2005 to collect information about occupational regulatory bodies in Ontario. On November 1, 2006, the Minister’s report on the five-year review of the Social Work and Social Service Work Act was released. The report made some recommendations regarding amendments to the act and to the registration regulation. As yet, these recommendations have not been implemented.

A career map is being developed and is close to completion. In addition, the college is reviewing its website to improve navigation and to clarify the registration process.

8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS

Definitions used in these tables:

Alternative class of licence: a class of licence that enables its holder to practise with limitations; additional registration requirements must be met in order to be fully licensed. Alternative classes of licence granted by the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers are specified under the tables below.

Applicant: an individual who has applied to start the process for entry to the profession.

Applicant actively pursuing licensing: an applicant who had some contact with the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers within the year specified.

Inactive applicant: an applicant who had no contact with the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers within the year specified.

Member: an individual who is currently able to use the protected title or professional designation of “social worker” or “social service worker.”

Languages in which application information materials are available
Language 2005 2006 2007
English

Yes

Yes

Yes

French

Yes

Yes

Yes

Other(s)

 

 

 

Countries where internationally educated applicants were initially trained in social work and social service work
Applications received 2005 2006 2007
Largest number

United States

United States

United States

Second-largest number

India

India

India

Third-largest number

United Kingdom

Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Fourth-largest number

Pakistan

Pakistan

Philippines

Fifth-largest number

tied1

tied1

United Kingdom

1 Tied among five countries in 2005 and 2006.

Staff employed by the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers
Number of staff 2005 2006 2007
Involved in registration process1

7

10.5

10.5

Involved in appeals process2

2

2

2

1 Includes the Registrar and Deputy Registrar.

2 Administrative support only.

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in social work and social service work
(before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
Members Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
Social Worker (RSW) members/
Social Service Worker (RSSW) members

8,872/1,095

937/4

715/3

404/7

10,928/1,109

Non-practising members

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants processed by the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers in 2005

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in social work and social service work (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)

In 2005 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received for RSWs/RSSWs

559/152

76/0

62/0

46/1

743/153

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who became members – RSWs/RSSWs

530/139

70/0

58/0

41/0

699/139

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence1 but were not issued a licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence1

0

0

0

0

0

1 Certificate of Registration with terms, conditions or limitations (provisional – SW or SSW)

Applicants processed by the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers in 2006

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in social work and social service work (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)

In 2006 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received for RSWs/RSSWs

583/168

70/1

54/2

46/1

753/172

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who became members – RSWs/RSSWs

557/157

67/0

46/0

42/0

712/157

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence1 but were not issued a licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence1

0

0

0

0

0

1 Certificate of Registration with terms, conditions or limitations (provisional – SW or SSW)

Applicants processed by the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers in 2007

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in social work and social service work (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2007 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received for RSWs/RSSWs

706/207

84/0

79/0

51/4

920/211

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who became members – RSWs/RSSWs

633/160

73/0

60/0

44/4

810/164

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence1 but were not issued a licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence1

0

0

0

0

0

1 Certificate of Registration with terms, conditions or limitations (provisional – SW or SSW)

9. SOURCES

Canadian Association of Schools of Social Work website: http://www.cassw-acess.ca/xASSOC/as1.htm. Last accessed: February 22, 2008.

Canadian Association of Social Workers website: http://www.casw-acts.ca/. Last accessed: February 12, 2008.

Council on Social Work Education website: http://www.cswe.org/CSWE/. Last accessed: February 12, 2008

Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers website: http://www.ocswssw.org. Last accessed: February 22, 2008.

Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers and the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, Ontario. “Access to the Social Worker and Social Service Worker Designation in Ontario.” Draft document provided to the Office of the Fairness Commissioner by OCSWSSW.

Representatives of the Ontario College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers met with staff of the Office of the Fairness Commissioner on January 14, 2008, to provide further information for this study.