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Study of Registration Practices of the
COLLEGE OF PHYSIOTHERAPISTS OF ONTARIO, 2007

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION
  2. 2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Legislation
    2. b. Protected Titles
    3. c. Definition of the Profession
    4. d. Labour Market/Economic Trends
    5. e. New Developments Within the Profession
    6. f. Staffing
  3. 3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES
    1. a. Registration Requirements and Application Process
    2. b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals
    3. c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)
    4. d. Academic/Program Requirements
    5. e. Work Experience Requirements
    6. f. Examinations
    7. g. Language Requirements
    8. h. Fees
    9. i. Third Parties
    10. j. Typical Length of the Registration Process
    11. k. Accredited Programs
    12. l. Internal Review/Appeal Process
  4. 4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS
  5. 5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS
  6. 6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Nature and Frequency of Communication
    2. b. Backlogs
    3. c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process
  7. 7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY
  8. 8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS
  9. 9. SOURCES

ISBN 978-1-4249-6474-1 [HTML English version]


1. INTRODUCTION

The Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC) undertook a study of registration practices of Ontario's regulated professions during the fall and winter of 2007–2008. The purpose of the study was to understand each regulated profession's 2007 registration practices and to establish baseline data and information to enable the OFC to measure progress as it fulfills its mandate under the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006.

This report reflects the registration practices of the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario as of December 31, 2007. Information in this report was gathered from:

The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario also provided registration information and statistics for 2005, 2006 and 2007 through a standard spreadsheet designed by the OFC.

An analysis and summary of the findings for all of the regulated professions is contained in the OFC's Ontario’s Regulated Professions: Report on the 2007 Study of Registration Practices.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY

a. Legislation

The Board of Directors of Physiotherapy was established in 1955 and is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to regulating the practice of physiotherapists in the public interest. Originally regulated under the authority of the Drugless Practitioners Act, the Board became the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario (CPO) with the proclamation of the Regulated Health Professions Act and the Physiotherapy Act, 1991. The registration regulation for entry to practice is Ontario Regulation 68/06.

b. Protected Titles

The CPO regulates physiotherapists or physical therapists. Under the provisions of the Physiotherapy Act, 1991, only those who are registered with the CPO are permitted to use the title "physiotherapist" or "physical therapist." There are approximately 6,700 registrants.

c. Definition of the Profession

The practice of physiotherapy is the assessment of physical function and the treatment, rehabilitation and prevention of physical dysfunction, injury or pain, to develop, maintain, rehabilitate or augment function or to relieve pain.

When engaging in the practice of physiotherapy, a member is authorized, subject to the terms, conditions and limitations imposed on his or her certificate of registration, to perform the following:

d. Labour Market/Economic Trends

The overall employment outlook for physiotherapists is good and should remain stable into the future. As the population ages, physiotherapists will be in demand. At the same time, anticipated retirements within the physiotherapy workforce could put ever-increasing pressures on the supply of physiotherapy professionals. Most opportunities will be presented through health care facilities such as hospitals, community agencies and clinics that are run privately.

Although most workers in this occupation are employees of an organization and work full-time, a significant number of physiotherapists work part-time and many are self-employed.

Approximately 55 per cent of registrants practise in a private practice.

e. New Developments Within the Profession

The CPO is working with the Canadian Institute of Health Information (CIHI) to develop a national database to allow for better collection and use of health human resources information about physiotherapists in Canada. The CPO has also been involved with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Allied Health Human Resources Database project.

Recently, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care changed how it funds physiotherapy services, and this change has had an impact on the profession. Members of other occupations are filling positions formerly filled by physiotherapists for rehabilitation services that continue to be funded.

Advanced practice roles are evolving for physiotherapists, and Health Force Ontario is assisting with this development.

The CPO has approximately 200 to 300 new applicants per year, and the body is growing by about 100 registrants per year.

The CPO recognizes new challenges in the area of health promotion. The practice of physiotherapy is associated with health centres and fitness.

f. Staffing

The CPO staff consists of 20 full-time employees and 60 to 80 contract staff and investigators. Twenty-seven other people also volunteer as council members or in other roles.

Applications to the CPO are handled by three full-time employees dedicated to this task. Other staff may assist as needed.

3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES

a. Registration Requirements and Application Process

i. Registration Requirements

Applicants for registration must meet these requirements:

To practise physiotherapy in Ontario, applicants must be registered members of the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. Registration requirements are the same for domestic applicants and internationally trained individuals. There are two main categories of registration: Provisional Practice and Independent Practice.

A Provisional Practice Certificate allows applicants to work as physiotherapy residents while they are waiting to take the clinical component of the Physiotherapy Competency Examination. During this time, candidates must be monitored by a registered physiotherapist.

An Independent Practice Certificate allows applicants to practise independently as physiotherapists in Ontario.

These documents are required for all categories of registration:

ii. Application Process

Step 1 – Review of Credentials and Proof of Language Proficiency

The Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (the Alliance) must review the credentials of all applicants, including Canadian applicants. Applicants whose degrees in physiotherapy are from accredited Canadian universities will be directed to proceed to step 2. Applicants with other credentials are first evaluated to determine whether their education and experience are substantially equivalent to (that is, evaluated to be equal to) those of Canadian-educated physiotherapists.

For language proficiency requirements, see 3.g.

Step 2 – Pass the Physiotherapy Competency Exam (PCE), Part One: Written Component (Qualifying Exam)

For examinations, see 3.f.

Step 3 – Register for the Physiotherapy Competency Exam (PCE) Part Two: Clinical Component

For examinations, see 3.f.

Step 4 – Apply to the College for a Provisional Practice Certificate

Once applicants have registered to take Part Two: Clinical Component, they may apply to the CPO for a Provisional Practice Certificate.

In addition to the documents required for all categories of registration, applicants must provide the following when they apply for a Provisional Practice Certificate:

The Provisional Practice Certificate will allow the applicant to work as a physiotherapy resident while being monitored by a registered physiotherapist. The certificate expires 12 weeks after the physiotherapy resident completes the Clinical Component of the PCE.

Step 5 – Pass the Physiotherapy Competency Exam (PCE) Part Two: Clinical Component

For examinations, see 3.f.

Step 6 – Apply to the College for a Certificate of Independent Practice

After applicants pass the Clinical Component, they may apply to the CPO for a Certificate of Independent Practice.

In order to work independently as physiotherapists in Ontario, applicants must be registered with the CPO and have a Certificate of Independent Practice.

When applicants apply for a Certificate of Independent Practice, they must submit a copy of the certificate provided by the Alliance that confirms successful completion of the Clinical Component. This is in addition to the documents required by all registration classes at the beginning of the registration process.

In order to continue practising as physiotherapists in Ontario, applicants must renew their registration with the CPO by March 31 of every year and pay the fee for the Certificate of Independent Practice. The renewal fee is the same as the initial registration fee.

b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals

i. Standard Documentation

The Alliance requires internationally trained individuals to submit these documents for assessment of their credentials:

These educational documents are also required:

ii. Options for Applicants with Unavailable/Destroyed Documents

The Alliance has a policy to deal with unavailable documents. Under these circumstances, the Alliance accepts a number of alternative pieces of documentation, including a statutory declaration, and applicants are managed on a case-by-case basis. This policy is not on the Alliance’s website.

c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)

The CPO uses the Alliance as its assessment body and does not get involved in the credential evaluation process for individual applicants. However, the CPO is active at the systems level to ensure that processes reflect best practices and are fair and valid.

If the Alliance finds that an applicant has a degree in physiotherapy from an accredited Canadian university or that his or her credentials are substantially equivalent to those of a Canadian-educated physiotherapist, the applicant will be eligible to register for Part One: Written Component of the Physiotherapy Competency Examination.

The Alliance uses the following three criteria to determine if the applicant’s education and experience are “substantially equivalent”:

If the Alliance determines that the applicant’s education is not substantially equivalent to the education of a Canadian-educated physiotherapist but is sufficiently close, the applicant may be eligible for the Prior Learning Assessment and Remediation (PLAR) program.

Prior learning assessment gives applicants credit for education and experience that were obtained outside of academic physiotherapy education that are relevant to physiotherapy. Remediation is a program that offers courses to upgrade physiotherapy education.

d. Academic/Program Requirements

To be a physiotherapist in Ontario, an applicant must have completed a university degree program in physiotherapy or equivalent and must have successfully passed a national exam. (Applicants who do not hold a degree in physiotherapy, but who held registration in a Canadian jurisdiction on December 30, 1993, qualify under the grandparenting clause in the CPO’s registration regulation.)

Internationally trained individuals must have their educational credentials assessed as “substantially equivalent” to those of Canadian-educated physiotherapists.

e. Work Experience Requirements

There is no work experience requirement for registration in the profession. However, the CPO requires 1,200 practice hours for continuing competence when it has been more than five years since an applicant completed the Physiotherapy Competency Exam.

f. Examinations

The Physiotherapy Competency Exam (PCE) consists of two parts. Part One is a written qualifying exam. Applicants must successfully complete the written qualifying exam before advancing to Part Two. Part Two is a clinical exam known as the Clinical Component. The PCE exam is a national and standardized examination.

Exemptions from the examination are granted to those applicants who held registration in a Canadian jurisdiction on December 30, 1993. Exemptions are granted to those applicants who come from signatory provinces to the Physiotherapy Mutual Recognition Agreement. The Registration Committee will consider granting exemptions to the examination requirement on a case-by-case basis, although this rarely occurs.

All internationally educated applicants must have their educational credentials and qualifications assessed by the Alliance to confirm eligibility to take the PCE.

i. Written Component (Qualifying Exam)

Part One of the PCE is a written exam. It is offered six times a year and is held at numerous sites across the country. When applicants register to complete the written exam, the Alliance will send an orientation resource package with information about the exam.

The exam is a written multiple-choice examination that tests knowledge of physiotherapy. It includes questions on basic sciences, physical therapy theory, research, assessment, planning and treatment. The exam takes four hours to complete.

If applicants do not pass Part One: Written Component, they may repeat it two times within two years of the failed examination. Candidates who fail the written component three or four times are not eligible to rewrite the exam unless they take further training, which must be approved by the Director of Examinations of the Alliance.

ii. Clinical Component

Applicants must successfully complete Part One: Written Component before they can register for Part Two: Clinical Component. Although candidates must successfully complete the Written Component before advancing to the Clinical Component, candidates are encouraged to pre-register for the Clinical Component by the deadline dates indicated in the Candidate Handbook. Exam site assignments are based on the date the completed application is received. Positions are allocated on a first applied, first assigned basis. Candidates will not be automatically registered for the Clinical Component, nor will the deadline date for the Clinical Component be extended following the release of the results.

To register for Part Two: Clinical Component applicants must complete the appropriate application form and send it, with the required fee, to the Alliance.

The Clinical Component is offered twice a year. The location of the exam depends on how many candidates need to write it, and where they live. It is usually offered in Halifax, Ottawa (bilingual site), Toronto, Hamilton, Edmonton and Vancouver. Not all sites are available at each administration of the exam.

The clinical exam is a practical demonstration of the applicant’s physiotherapy skills in a clinical setting and includes an assessment of interaction with patients. It is designed to test clinical skills of assessment, history taking, clinical problem solving, treatment and treatment planning and communication skills. The Clinical Component takes four and a half hours.

If applicants fail the Clinical Component, they may repeat it two times within two years of the failed examination. Applicants who fail the Clinical Component three or four times are not eligible to retake the exam unless they take further training, which must be approved by the Director of Examinations of the Alliance.

g. Language Requirements

The Alliance verifies language requirements on behalf of the CPO. Applicants are required to demonstrate that they can understand, speak and write either English or French.

If the language of applicants’ physiotherapy education was English or French, they are exempt from language assessment. If applicants did not complete their physiotherapy education in English or French, they must write one of the tests listed below to prove language fluency in English or French. Applicants may be able to write these tests in their country before coming to Canada, but test scores are valid for only two years. The test scores must be sent directly by the testing institution to the Alliance.

The Alliance will accept any one of the following tests as proof of language proficiency:

h. Fees[1]

Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators

Fee for credential review

$725

Fee for Physiotherapy Competency Exam[2]

$1,775

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario

Application fee

$100

Fee for Provisional Practice Certificate

$70

Fee for Independent Practice Certificate[3]

$600

Annual registration

$600

Language Assessment

CanTEST

$195 – $230

IELTS

$245 – $275

MELAB

$120 US

TSE

$125 US

TOEFL

$140 – $160 US

i. Third Parties

Name of Third Party Relationship to Regulatory Body

Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators

Conducts the educational credential review and examination process.

Professional Examination Service (PES), New York

Educates and trains the Registration Committee, and reviews the Alliance examinations process against international standards.

j. Typical Length of the Process

The CPO registration process can take several weeks to complete. The Alliance’s process takes, on average, 4 to 14 weeks, depending on a number of factors including whether the educational institution is familiar to the Alliance, whether the application was complete and how quickly the educational institution verified the applicant’s status. The Alliance results are valid for two years.

The Alliance offers the written examination six times per year. Results of the written exam are sent to applicants approximately 3 to 4 weeks after the written exam and approximately 5 to 6 weeks after the clinical exam.

Applications for a provisional licence take 10 business days for the CPO to complete.

k. Accredited Programs

The Accreditation Council for Canadian Physiotherapy Academic Programs (ACCPAP) is responsible for assuring the quality of physiotherapy education in Canada through a comprehensive program of accreditation. The accreditation program includes:

The ACCPAP website lists the following as accredited physiotherapist education programs in Canada.

Ontario

McMaster University, Hamilton
Master of Clinical Health Sciences (Physiotherapy) Program

Queen's University, Kingston
Master of Science in Physical Therapy Program (Stream 1)

University of Ottawa
Bachelor of Science in Physiotherapy Program (by 2010, the program will be at the master’s level)

University of Toronto
Master of Science in Physical Therapy Program

University of Western Ontario, London
Master of Physical Therapy Program

Alberta

University of Alberta, Edmonton
Master of Science in Physical Therapy Program (Course-based)

British Columbia

University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Master of Physical Therapy Program

Manitoba

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg
Bachelor of Medical Rehabilitation (Physiotherapy) Program

Nova Scotia

Dalhousie University, Halifax
Bachelor of Sciences in Physiotherapy Program

Quebec*

McGill University, Montreal
Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy Program

Université Laval, Quebec City
Le programme de baccalauréat en sciences de la santé (physiothérapie)

Université de Montréal
Le programme de baccalauréat ès sciences en physiothérapie

Saskatchewan

University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon
Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy Program

*Université de Sherbrooke is launching a master’s program in physiotherapy. It has not yet been accredited.

i. Internal Review/Appeal Process

Review and appeal mechanisms exist for final registration decisions. The relationship of the review/appeal bodies to the decision-making body in the registration process is an arm’s-length one.

The Registration Committee is the body that reviews applications from individuals wishing to practise as physiotherapists in Ontario. It also considers applications to remove or modify any terms, conditions or limitations placed on registrants’ certificates of registration, and it handles individual applicants’ requests or matters that fall outside registration standards and policy. It is composed of two public appointees, two physiotherapist members of Council and a non-Council physiotherapist.

As set out in the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991, appeals are handled by the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB), an independent administrative tribunal that has the authority to review decisions of colleges’ Registration and Complaints Committees upon request of the parties involved. Limited information about the HPARB process is currently accessible on the CPO’s website.

Applicants can access the documents concerning the decisions made in their case.

The Alliance has separate appeals and administrative reconsideration processes for the credential and examination portions of the registration process. The administrative reconsideration channel is an internal review performed by the Executive Director of the Alliance.

4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS

The profession does not have a formal bridging program that teaches Canadian physiotherapy content or helps applicants fill in gaps in their education and/or training. However, the CPO provides an Exam Skills Preparation Program for internationally educated physiotherapists, which aims to better prepare them to take the Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE). The program consists of four learning modules:

  1. An overview of exam context and use in Canada

  2. Skill development in writing multiple choice exams

  3. Skill development in taking clinical based practical exams

  4. Post-exam follow-up and support.

Each module can be taken independently or in combination. The last module is for applicants who have failed the exam and need coaching to develop learning strategies that may help them to succeed.

This project is being led by the CPO, in collaboration with a Partners Group consisting of the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators, McMaster University and ACCES, which is a community agency providing employment and training services to internationally educated individuals.

5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS

The CPO is a signatory to a domestic mutual recognition agreement among the provincial regulatory organizations for physiotherapy. The Physiotherapy Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) establishes the conditions under which a physiotherapist with an unrestricted practice certificate in one jurisdiction will be recognized and allowed to practise in any other jurisdiction in Canada, if he or she does not meet the regular provincial registration requirements.

The MRA provides “acceptance by regulatory organizations in the originating and receiving jurisdictions that the qualifications of their workers in a given occupation conform to one another’s occupational standard without requiring the worker to undergo any additional assessment.”[4]

The MRA covers three main areas that are accepted on a national level. These are education, examination and practice-hour requirements. In addition, all provincial regulatory organizations agree to maintain occupational standards that are competency-based, that are readily accessible and that do not impose any undue burdens on applicants from other jurisdictions.

6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY

a. Nature and Frequency of Communication

The CPO has both written and electronic contact with an applicant throughout the completion of the registration process. The nature and frequency of communication vary from applicant to applicant.

b. Backlogs

The CPO has no backlogs in its registration process.

c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process

The CPO is committed to customer satisfaction and does an ongoing evaluation of its processes for purposes of improvement. Complaints are particular to the individual and although the CPO has no formalized/documented process for handling such complaints, representatives will have one-on-one meetings with applicants and will mediate disputes between the Alliance and the applicant, if necessary. CPO staff members may escalate an issue to the Registrar for resolution, depending on the circumstances.

7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY

The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration conducted a survey in 2005 to collect information about occupational regulatory bodies in Ontario.

Since 2005, the CPO added information on its website for internationally trained individuals. The organization also has an Exam Preparation Program, a new strategic plan, and a balanced scorecard (a tool for measuring accountability). It has begun to work with Professional Examination Service (PES), an organization that provides assessment and consulting services to organizations across a broad range of professions, in support of professional licensure and certification, training and continuing professional education.

In the fall of 2006, the CPO undertook a registration practices self-audit prior to the introduction of Bill 124, the government-recommended Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006. It was based on ISO 17024, General Requirements for Bodies Operating Certification Schemes for Persons, to ensure an ongoing, prescheduled review of the CPO’s entry-to-practice system for transparency and fairness. The CPO now has an audit tool, a gap analysis of current practices against audit standards, and a series of recommendations for continued development and improvement. The CPO produced a report as evidence of its commitment to excellence in regulation.

The Alliance and the Canadian Physiotherapy Association conducted research in an effort to reveal what factors or barriers most acutely affect the successful integration of internationally educated physiotherapists into the Canadian health system. Eight issues were identified and discussed in a March 2007 report entitled Integrating Internationally Educated Physiotherapists:

The two organizations recognized that the trends in both the demand for physiotherapists and the changing characteristics of professionals entering the field underscore the need for improved integration efforts to ensure a reliable supply of skilled and qualified physiotherapists in the years to come.

8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS

Definitions used in these tables:

Alternative class of licence: a class of licence that enables its holder to practise with limitations; additional registration requirements must be met in order to be fully licensed. An alternative class of licence granted by the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario is specified under the below.

Applicant: a person who has applied to the CPO to start the process for entry to the profession.

Applicant actively pursuing licensing: an applicant who had some contact with the CPO within the year specified.

Inactive applicant: an applicant who had no contact with the CPO within the year specified.

Member: a person who is currently able to use the protected title or professional designation “physiotherapist” or “physical therapist.”

Languages in which application information materials were available
Language 2005 2006 2007
English

Yes

Yes

Yes

French1

Yes

Yes

Yes

Other(s)

1 Some materials are in French, but not all.

Countries where internationally educated applicants were initially trained in physiotherapy
Applications received 2005 2006 2007
Largest number

India

India

United States

Second-largest number

United States

United States

India

Third-largest number

Iran

Australia

Philippines

Fourth-largest number

United Kingdom

Poland

Poland

Fifth-largest number

Australia, Pakistan, Poland (tied)

Philippines

Australia, United Kingdom(tied)

Staff employed by the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario
Number of staff 2005 2006 2007
Involved in registration process

2.5 - 31

3

3

Involved in appeals process2

N/A

N/A

N/A

1From January to April 2005, there were 2.5 staff; for the remainder of the year, there were 3 staff members.

2Appeals are handled externally through HPARB; therefore, no CPO staff work on appeals.

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in physiotherapy (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
Members Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
Total members

4,457

761

134

993

6,345

Non-practising members

328

55

11

69

463

Applicants processed by the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario in 2005

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in physiotherapy (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2005 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

199

33

14

42

288

Applicants actively pursuing licensing1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who became members2

199

32

14

41

286

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3

153

6

11

38

246

1The CPO does not collect information for this category.

2Includes provisional practice certificate holders.

3Provisional Practice: These individuals have passed the written exam and are waiting to complete the next clinical exam.

Applicants processed by the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario in 2006

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in physiotherapy (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2006 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

249

34

18

63

364

Applicants actively pursuing licensing1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who became members2

249

34

18

63

364

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3

198

12

16

56

282

1The CPO does not collect information for this category.

2Includes provisional practice certificate holders.

3Provisional Practice: These individuals have passed the written exam and are waiting to complete the next clinical exam.

Applicants processed by the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario in 2007

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in physiotherapy (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2007 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

250

45

34

71

400

Applicants actively pursuing licensing1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who became members2

250

44

34

70

398

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3

201

13

24

65

303

1The CPO does not collect information for this category.

2Includes provisional practice certificate holders.

3Provisional Practice: These individuals have passed the written exam and are waiting to complete the next clinical exam.

9. SOURCES

Accreditation Council for Canadian Physiotherapy Academic Programs website. http://www.accpap.ca/. Last accessed: February 4, 2008.

Association of Test Publishers website. http://www.testpublishers.org/Services/pes.htm [bad link!!!]. Last accessed: February 4, 2008.

Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators. Integrating Internationally Educated Physiotherapists. March 2007.

Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website. http://www.alliancept.org. Last accessed: February 5, 2008.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario website. http://www.collegept.org/college. Last accessed: February 7, 2008.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. Information Bulletin: “Physiotherapy Agreement to Facilitate Labour Mobility” 2006.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. “Moving Between Provinces?”: Physiotherapy Labour Mobility Fact Sheet 2006.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. Exam Skills Preparation Program Fact Sheet.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. Strategic Framework 2007 - 2010. March 2007.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. Registration Practices Self Audit.

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario and Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. “Access to the Physiotherapy Profession in Ontario.” Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration website. http://www.citizenship.gov.on.ca/english/working/career/professions/physiotherapists.shtml. Last accessed: February 7, 2008.

Physiotherapy Mutual Recognition Agreement, Approved, Endorsed. October 26, 2002.

Representatives of the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario met with staff of the Office of the Fairness Commissioner on November 9, 2007, to provide further information for this study.



[1] CPO fees do not differ for internationally trained individuals.

[2] This amount represents the costs of the written and clinical components combined.

[3] The $70 that was paid for the Provisional Practice Certificate is deducted from the Independent Practice Certificate fee the first time the member moves to independent practice.

[4] Physiotherapy Mutual Recognition Agreement, Approved, Endorsed October 26, 2002.