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Study of Registration Practices of the
COLLEGE OF MEDICAL RADIATION TECHNOLOGISTS OF ONTARIO, 2007

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION
  2. 2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Legislation
    2. b. Protected Titles
    3. c. Definition of the Profession
    4. d. Labour Market/Economic Trends
    5. e. New Developments Within the Profession
    6. f. Staffing
  3. 3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES
    1. a. Registration Requirements and Application Process
    2. b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals
    3. c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)
    4. d. Academic/Program Requirements
    5. e. Work Experience Requirements
    6. f. Examinations
    7. g. Language Requirements
    8. h. Fees
    9. i. Third Parties
    10. j. Typical Length of the Registration Process
    11. k. Accredited Programs
    12. l. Internal Review/Appeal Process
  4. 4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS
  5. 5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS
  6. 6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Nature and Frequency of Communication
    2. b. Backlogs
    3. c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process
  7. 7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY
  8. 8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS
  9. 9. SOURCES

ISBN 978-1-4249-6460-4 [HTML English version]


1. INTRODUCTION

The Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC) undertook a study of registration practices of Ontario's regulated professions during the fall and winter of 2007–2008. The purpose of the study was to understand each regulated profession's 2007 registration practices and to establish baseline data and information to enable the OFC to measure progress as it fulfills its mandate under the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006.

This report reflects the registration practices of the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario as of December 31, 2007. Information in this report was gathered from:

The College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario also provided registration information and statistics for 2005, 2006 and 2007 through a standard spreadsheet designed by the OFC.

An analysis and summary of the findings for all of the regulated professions is contained in the OFC's Ontario’s Regulated Professions: Report on the 2007 Study of Registration Practices.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY

a. Legislation

The College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario (CMRTO) operates in accordance with the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 and the Medical Radiation Technology Act, 1991. The registration of medical radiation technologists is governed by Ontario Regulation 866/93, as amended.

b. Protected Titles

To practise as a medical radiation technologist in Ontario, a person must be registered with the CMRTO. The title “medical radiation technologist” or the abbreviation MRT can be used only by members of the college.

Only a member of the college who holds a specialty certificate of registration may use the following terms or their abbreviations. (Members who resign from the college are unable to use the title “medical radiation technologist” until such time as they reinstate their membership.)

c. Definition of the Profession

A medical radiation technologist (MRT) is a qualified professional who uses radiation or electromagnetism to produce diagnostic images of a patient’s body or who administers radiation to treat patients for certain medical conditions, on the order of a physician.

During two to five years of education, MRTs are trained to use sophisticated and complex imaging and radiation therapy equipment. MRTs use this equipment on the order of a physician to produce images of different parts of the body, which are then interpreted by a physician. MRTs also apply radiation to parts of the body for radiation therapy, on the order of a physician.

Medical radiation technologists work in health care facilities, including hospitals, clinics and cancer centres.

i. Medical Radiation Technologist Specialties

Radiography

Radiography is the use of x-rays to produce images of parts of the body for the diagnosis of disease, trauma and congenital abnormalities. Medical radiation technologists registered in radiography may perform general x-rays, fluoroscopic examinations, angiography, mammography and computed tomography.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy is the use of ionizing radiation to treat diseases such as cancer. Medical radiation technologists registered in radiation therapy work together with oncologists to plan treatment, administer treatment and educate the patient on how to cope with side effects.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine is the use of radiopharmaceuticals to produce images of the body and treat disease. Medical radiation technologists registered in nuclear medicine use gamma cameras and computer systems to assess organ function and structure, and help in the diagnosis of numerous disorders. Nuclear medicine is used in the treatment of thyroid diseases, certain blood disorders, and bone metastases.

Magnetic Resonance

Magnetic resonance is the use of electromagnetism (static magnetic fields and radio frequencies) to produce diagnostic images. Medical radiation technologists registered in magnetic resonance play a significant role in imaging the brain, spine, abdomen, pelvis and musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems.

A medical radiation technologist can perform a radiographic, nuclear medicine or magnetic resonance examination or a radiation therapy treatment on a patient only when a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario orders the procedure.

ii. Authorized Procedures of Medical Radiation Technologists

In addition to using radiation and electromagnetism, there are four procedures that MRTs are authorized to perform on the order of a physician. These are:

d. Labour Market/Economic Trends

In Ontario there are approximately 6,200 registered medical radiation technologists employed in hospitals, private clinics, cancer centres, research laboratories, industry, education and administration. Hospitals and clinics employ medical radiation technologists in the specialties of magnetic resonance and radiography. Major clinics, cancer centres and hospitals in large urban centres employ medical radiation technologists in the specialties of radiation therapy and nuclear medicine.

Most medical radiation technologists work full-time, with a 40-hour work week that includes weekend, evening and stand-by work. About 20 per cent of all employed medical radiation technologists in Ontario work part-time. Since the mid-1990s there has been a growing number of part-time, casual and contract positions available. There is a growing need for medical radiation technologists in Ontario.

e. New Developments Within the Profession

In 2005, the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario (CMRTO) proposed amendments to its registration regulation in order to clarify the intent and meaning of the wording of sections 4(1) 1 iii and 4.1 (1) 1 iii relating to the assessment by the Registration Committee of the educational programs of internationally trained applicants in each of the four specialties of medical radiation technology.

The amendment establishes that an applicant who has successfully completed a medical radiation technology program in one of the specialties “offered outside Ontario and considered by the Registration Committee to be substantially similar, but not equivalent, to a program” in that specialty offered in Ontario meets the educational requirement of completing a program in medical radiation technology in that specialty. The applicant must also satisfy the Registration Committee regarding his or her competence to practise medical radiation technology in that specialty. This amendment came into effect on March 6, 2006.

f. Staffing

The staff of the CMRTO consists of nine full-time positions. Four out of the nine employees are involved in the registration process. The amount of staff time required for the registration process is equivalent to approximately 2.5 full-time positions.

3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES

a. Registration Requirements and Application Process

An applicant is someone who submits an application form with the required documentation and pays the application fee to the college.

i. Basic Requirements for Registration

To obtain a Certificate of Registration as a medical radiation technologist in Ontario, all applicants (domestic or internationally trained) must meet the requirements as set out in the college’s registration regulation. The regulation requires that an applicant:

In addition, the following requirements are essential for registration with the college in one or more of the specialties:

The Registration Committee makes no exceptions to these requirements. Applicants must satisfy these requirements in the same specialty for which they apply. Applicants who wish to apply to the CMRTO in more than one specialty must complete an application form, and submit the application and evaluation fee, if applicable, for each specialty.

ii. Steps in the Application Process for Ontario Graduates

Step 1 – Complete the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario (CMRTO) application form
Applicants should carefully read and complete both Parts A and B of the form except in the areas indicated for the use of the training institution and administration.

Step 2 – Submit Part A of the application to the college
Applicants must have Part A signed by their program director and submit it to the college, along with the application fee and proof of Canadian citizenship or other appropriate documentation, at least 90 days before writing the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT) examination. The college will confirm the application status and provide applicants with a receipt.

Step 3 – Give Part B to program director
The applicant’s program director will sign Part B and submit it to the college at the end of the program. This will provide confirmation that the applicant has successfully completed the educational program.

Step 4 – Write the CAMRT examination

Step 5 – Provide evidence to the college that the applicant has passed the CAMRT examination

Step 6 – Complete the application information update form and pay the registration fee
When all the requirements for registration are met, the college will provide the applicant with the Application Information Update form to complete and let the applicant know the amount of the registration fee (annual fee prorated to the applicant’s birthday).

Step 7 – Receive confirmation from the college that the applicant is registered
The college will provide the applicant with a certificate of registration and a registration number. The applicant or the applicant’s employer can confirm registration status over the phone. The college will also mail a new member package, which includes information about the college and the Quality Assurance Program.

iii. Steps in the Application Process for Canadian Graduates (Outside Ontario)

The CMRTO Council has determined that all of the programs offered in the other provinces that have been accredited by the Conjoint Committee for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in Diagnostic Imaging and Medical Radiation Technologies of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) are equivalent to the approved programs offered in Ontario.

Applicants who have completed a program in medical radiation technology in Canada but outside Ontario must submit an application form and do the following:

If the applicant meets all the requirements for registration, the college will inform the applicant of the amount of the registration fee (annual fee prorated to the applicant’s birthday).

Once the applicant has submitted the registration fee, the college will provide the applicant with a certificate of registration and a registration number. The college also provides the applicant with the CMRTO Legislation Learning Package at no cost, in order that the applicant has knowledge of the appropriate statutes, regulations, policies and guidelines dealing with the practice of medical radiation technology in Ontario.

iv. Steps in the Application Process for Internationally Trained Individuals

Step 1 – Undergo an Academic Credentials Assessment
See section 3.c below.

Step 2 — Complete Clinical Competence Assessment
See section 3.e below.

Step 3 — Demonstrate Language Proficiency
See section 3.g below.

Step 4 — Additional Training
See section 3.d below.

Step 5 — Write the CAMRT National Examination
See section 3.f below.

Step 6 — Registration
Once applicants have completed the requirements of the Registration Committee, passed the CAMRT exam, submitted the registration fee (annual fee prorated to the applicant’s birthday), and completed any other requirements as directed by the Registration Committee, they will be issued a Certificate of Registration and a CMRTO number. Applicants are then be able to practise in Ontario as medical radiation technologists in the specialty indicated on the Certificate of Registration. To continue practising, members must pay an annual fee on or before their birthday every year.

b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals

i. Required Documentation

All applications from internationally educated medical radiation technologists must undergo an assessment process conducted by the CMRTO. The college reviews the educational training and experience in medical radiation technology that applicants have from another country to determine whether they meet the requirements for registration with the CMRTO. An internationally trained applicant must submit the following documents and information:[1]

ii. Options for Applicants with Unavailable/Destroyed Documents

If an applicant is unable to provide the original or notarized copies of the necessary documents, the Registration Committee may choose to accept other evidence, such as an original letter from the educational program. Applicants are advised to contact CMRTO if they are unable to provide the original or notarized copies of the documents. The Registration Committee looks at these situations on a case-by-case basis.

c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)

All applications from internationally educated medical radiation technologists must undergo an assessment process conducted by CMRTO.

The CMRTO reviews all application forms received to ensure that they are complete. If applicants completed their education in medical radiation technology outside of Canada, their application form will be sent to the Registration Committee for review and a decision regarding the application for registration. Applicants will receive a letter notifying them that the Registration Committee will be reviewing their application and explaining the reasons for the review. If applicants have any new or additional information at that time or wish to make written submissions to the Registration Committee, they will have 30 days to submit them to the Registration Committee.

If applicants meet the requirements of the college’s registration regulation, they will be able to continue the registration process. If they do not meet the requirements of the college’s registration regulation, the Registration Committee has the authority to refuse to issue the applicant a Certificate of Registration. If they do not meet some of the requirements at the time of the review, such as a successful completion of the CMRTO approved examination, the Registration Committee may decide that they are eligible for registration, following the completion of certain requirements.

Once the Registration Committee completes the review of the application for registration, applicants receive a decision letter, along the Order and Reasons of the Registration Committee. The Order and Reasons clearly explain the reasons for the Registration Committee’s decision. Applicants are also be informed of their right to contact the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB) to appeal the decision of the Registration Committee if they do not agree with it.

It usually takes approximately four months from the time that the application for registration is accepted as complete to the time that the applicant receives the final decision of the Registration Committee.

If the Registration Committee approves an application, applicants can expect to have five years from the last date of their employment as a medical radiation technologist to complete all the requirements to become registered.

Based on the documents applicants provide with the application (see section 3.b), the Registration Committee will review their educational program to determine if it is substantially similar, but not equivalent, to an approved Ontario medical radiation technology program in their specialty. In the past, the Registration Committee has considered the following in its assessment of educational programs:

d. Academic/Program Requirements

To be registered with the CMRTO, an applicant must show evidence of having successfully completed a medical radiation technology program at an approved program in Ontario, at a program offered outside Ontario equivalent to an approved Ontario program, or at a program offered outside Ontario considered by the Registration Committee to be substantially similar, but not equivalent, to an approved Ontario program in medical radiation technology.

Additional Training. As part of its assessment of whether an internationally educated applicant is competent to practise in his or her specialty, the Registration Committee considers whether the applicant has:

e. Work Experience Requirements

CMRTO does not require Canadian experience in medical radiation technology. An applicant who completed a program in medical radiation technology outside of Canada is required under the registration regulation to demonstrate competence to practise in Ontario as a medical radiation technologist in his or her specialty. Competence is usually demonstrated through work experience in medical radiation technology in the applicant’s home country. The CMRTO application form has a Clinical Competence Form, which provides a detailed list of all the procedures for each specialty. Applicants must list in detail all the types of procedures they have performed during their most recent employment or in their current employment in their home country.

To confirm that applicants are competent in those procedures, and that their written certification is correct, the direct clinical supervisor in their most recent or current place of employment must read and sign the section called “Validation of Clinical Supervisor.” Their direct clinical supervisor must be either a medical radiation technologist, radiologist or radiation oncologist who supervised daily procedures.

The Registration Committee assesses the applicant’s competence to practise based on the details described in the application form and Clinical Competence Form. The Registration Committee considers the following factors in its assessment of an applicant’s competence to practise as a medical radiation technologist in Ontario:

Applicants must also provide proof that they have worked as medical radiation technologists or have completed a program in medical radiation technology within the last five years. A letter from their last or current employer stating the last date of employment is necessary to meet this requirement.

f. Examinations

The examination approved by the CMRTO Council is the national examination of the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT). All applicants must successfully complete the CAMRT examination in the specialty for which they apply.[2] After reviewing and approving the applications of internationally educated applicants, the CMRTO notifies them whether they are eligible to write this examination. The CAMRT sets and administers the certification examination for all provinces in Canada, except Quebec.

The CMRTO also notifies the CAMRT when internationally educated applicants are ready and approved to write the examination. Ontario graduates apply directly to the CAMRT to write the examination, through their educational programs. Canadian (outside Ontario) applicants have usually completed the CAMRT (or the OTRQ) examination at the time of application to the CMRTO.

Applicants must register for the examination directly with the CAMRT in Ottawa. The examination application form and examination preparation information can be found on the CAMRT website.

The CAMRT national exam is a standardized, multiple-choice exam that tests knowledge, skill and judgment (competencies) in each of the four specialties of medical radiation technology (radiography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance and radiation therapy).

This exam is one-day long and is offered three times a year – in January, May and September – at various locations throughout Canada. Sample examination questions and a reading list are included in the CAMRT’s Study Guide.

The CMRTO provides internationally educated applicants with a letter that makes it possible for them to join the library at the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences in Toronto. With that library card, applicants are able to borrow the textbooks necessary to prepare for the examination.

Internationally educated applicants have three chances, in a period of two years, to pass the exam, provided that it is within the time frame designated in the Registration Committee’s decision. Applicants who have graduated from an approved Ontario program have three chances, in a period of two years, to pass the exam, provided that it is within five years from completion of the program. Applicants who do not successfully complete the examination do not meet the requirements for registration set out in the regulation and are not eligible for registration with the college.

Successful completion of the CAMRT national examination is a non-exemptible requirement under the registration regulation.

g. Language Requirements

Internationally educated applicants whose professional training was in English or French should send confirmation from their training institution of the language of instruction and assessment in their program. This confirmation is acceptable as proof of language proficiency. The evidence from the applicant’s training institution should state clearly that all theoretical and clinical training and the examinations were in English or French.

Internationally educated applicants whose professional training was not in English or French must show other proof of language proficiency. The Registration Committee accepts the Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (iBT TOEFL) with a minimum total score of 45 in reading, listening, and writing, and a minimum score of 23 in speaking. The Registration Committee also accepts the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of at least 500 for the paper-based test or 173 for the computer-based test, and the Test of Spoken English (TSE) with a score of at least 40. Proof that the applicant has passed either the iBT TOEFL or the TOEFL and TSE may be submitted with the application form or later on in the registration process.

Internationally trained applicants are required to pay any costs related to proving language proficiency.

h. Fees

CMRTO application fee

$100 (plus GST)

CMRTO evaluation fee (credential assessment for internationally trained MRTs)

$250 (plus GST)

CMRTO annual registration fee

$360 (plus GST)

CAMRT examination fee (each exam)

$600 (in 2007)

CPR Level C Certificate Course

Ranges from $35 to $55

i. Third Parties

Name of Third Party Relationship to Regulatory Body

Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists (CAMRT)

Sets and administers certification examination

Access and Options Program at the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences

Assists landed immigrants with skills training, clinical experiences, personal support and guidance needed to pass the certification examination and to help prepare landed immigrants to work in Canada. This is a voluntary program.

Language testing services (TOEFL)

Administers language fluency tests.

j. Typical Length of the Registration Process

For internationally trained applicants, it usually takes approximately four months from the time the college receives a complete application to the time that the applicant receives the final decision (Order and Reasons) of the Registration Committee.

If the Registration Committee approves the application, internationally educated applicants can expect to have five years from the last date of their employment as a medical radiation technologist to complete the requirements for registration set out in the Order and Reasons, to become registered.

Ontario graduates must apply to the college at least 90 days prior to sitting the CAMRT examination. Ontario graduates have up to five years from the date of completing the college approved program in medical radiation technology to become registered.

k. Accredited Programs

The Council of the CMRTO reviews the approved programs regularly and they are subject to change without notice. (CMRTO does not use the term “accredited.”)

Radiography
Approved Programs in Ontario

Approved Programs Outside Ontario

The CMRTO Council has determined that all of the programs offered in all of the other provinces that have been accredited by the Conjoint Committee for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in Diagnostic Imaging and Medical Radiation Technologies of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) are equivalent to the approved programs offered in Ontario.

Radiation Therapy
Approved Programs in Ontario

Approved Programs Outside Ontario

The CMRTO Council has determined that all of the programs offered in all of the other provinces that have been accredited by the Conjoint Committee for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in Diagnostic Imaging and Medical Radiation Technologies of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) are equivalent to the approved programs offered in Ontario.

Nuclear Medicine
Approved Programs in Ontario

Approved Programs Outside Ontario

The CMRTO Council has determined that all of the programs offered in all of the other provinces that have been accredited by the Conjoint Committee for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in Diagnostic Imaging and Medical Radiation Technologies of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) are equivalent to the approved program offered in Ontario.

Magnetic Resonance Approved Program in Ontario

Approved Programs Outside Ontario

The CMRTO Council has determined that, in order for a medical radiation technology program in the specialty of magnetic resonance to be considered to be equivalent to the medical radiation technology program in the specialty of magnetic resonance offered at the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, it must be accredited by the Conjoint Committee for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in Diagnostic Imaging and Medical Radiation Technologies of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA).

l. Internal Review/Appeal Process

The Registration Committee reviews the educational programs in medical radiation technology completed by applicants who have completed programs outside Ontario to determine whether the program is considered to be substantially similar, but not equivalent to, an approved program offered in Ontario. The Registration Committee also considers whether these applicants meet the other requirements for registration. The applicant is notified by letter of any referrals to the Registration Committee by the Registrar, the statutory grounds of the referral, and the applicant’s right to make written submissions to the panel of the Registration Committee. This process also applies to Ontario graduates if they do not meet the requirements for registration set out in the regulation.

The Registration Committee is composed of five members appointed by the Council: one public member and four professional members, each representing one specialty. Of the five members, two are Council members (one public member appointed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council and one elected professional member) and three are members of the profession who are not Council members. The Registrar does not participate in the decision of the Registration Committee.

Applicants can request that the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB) review the decision of the Registration Committee. The applicant is notified by letter of the right to appeal the decision of the Registration Committee to HPARB at the same time that he or she is advised of the decision of the Registration Committee. This letter also contains the Order and Reasons of the committee. The Health Professions Appeal and Review Board is an independent adjudicative agency.

Applicants can request all the information concerning the decisions with respect to their case, which will be provided to them by the Registrar.

The information about appeals of registration decisions is not currently available on CMRTO’s website.

4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS

The Access and Options Program at the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences is a voluntary program available to assist landed immigrants with skills training, clinical experiences, personal support and guidance needed to pass the certification examination and to prepare them to work in Canada. Admission to the Access and Options Program is available only to those applicants who have received a decision from the college’s Registration Committee that states they are eligible for registration with the college, following the completion of certain requirements set out in the Order and Reasons of the Registration Committee.

The Access and Options program covers only two specialties: radiography and magnetic resonance. It does not cover nuclear medicine and radiation therapy.

Based on an individual assessment performed by the Access and Options program, an individualized program is developed to prepare applicants to write the certification examination. The program could take from five months up to a full year.

Due to the customized nature of the program, tuition is charged on a course-by-course basis.

The program offers courses and support in the following areas:

Courses are offered at the Michener Institute or through the Blackboard Learning System (distance education).

5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS

Currently, the profession of medical radiation technology has a mutual recognition agreement under the Agreement on Internal Trade. The agreement was signed in 2001 and all provinces, including Ontario, through either the relevant regulatory bodies, or voluntary professional associations are signatories to the agreement.

6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY

a. Nature and Frequency of Communication

The CMRTO has frequent contact with the applicant throughout the process. Communication is tailored to each applicant’s situation. Applicants can contact the CMRTO, via e-mail, mail, telephone and in person. Applicants who call are able to speak to a live representative from the college during business hours. Phone messages that are left overnight are returned on the next business day.

All e-mails received are answered with the relevant information requested. An application package is mailed or given in person to all prospective applicants who make inquiries to the CMRTO. Applicants who are out of the country or out of the Greater Toronto Area and not able to meet in person are supported through telephone meetings.

Walk-in applicants who are enquiring about the process may meet with the Director of Professional Practice or make an appointment. The Director of Professional Practice reviews the applicant’s documents for completeness and assists in determining which additional documents, if any, are required to ensure the application is complete for referral to the Registration Committee for review.

b. Backlogs

The college does not have a backlog of files.

A panel of the Registration Committee reviews all completed applications at the next meeting. The Registration Committee meets every six to eight weeks. Each application is reviewed at least twice by the panel: the first time to review the application and make a decision, the second to review and approve the Order and Reasons.

c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process

The CMRTO does not currently have any complaints from applicants regarding the registration process, nor are there currently any appeals before the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board regarding decisions of the CMRTO Registration Committee.

The CMRTO deals with concerns of applicants on a case-by-case basis. Questions and concerns of applicants are addressed on a pro-active and supportive manner.

7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY

The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration conducted a survey in 2005 to collect information about occupational regulatory bodies in Ontario. Since that time, the CMRTO career map was updated, in December 2006.

In addition, the Registration Committee attended an educational workshop on the assessment of foreign credentials presented by World Education Services (WES). This workshop was intended to broaden panel members’ understanding of educational systems throughout the world and to provide hands-on training. Additional training and education on the registration processes have been provided to the Director of Professional Practice.

The college has committed additional resources and time to helping internationally trained applicants in preparing applications for registration. The CMRTO continues to work with a number of external agencies in projects and initiatives related to internationally trained individuals.

8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS

Definitions used in these tables:

Alternative class of licence: a class of licence that enables its holder to practise with limitations; additional registration requirements must be met in order to be fully licensed. The College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario has no alternative classes of licence.

Applicant: an individual who has applied to start the process for entry to the profession.

Applicant actively pursuing licensing: an applicant who had some contact with the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario within the year specified.

Inactive applicant: an applicant who had no contact with the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario within the year specified.

Member: an individual who is currently able to use the protected title or professional designation of “medical radiation technologist” (MRT).

Languages in which application information materials are available
Language 2005 2006 2007
English

Yes

Yes

Yes

French

No

No

No

Other(s)

 

 

 

Countries where internationally educated applicants were initially trained in medical radiation technology
Applications received 2005 2006 2007
Largest number

Philippines

China

Philippines

Second-largest number

India

Iran

United States

Third-largest number

China

Philippines

India

Fourth-largest number

Iran

United States

Iran

Fifth-largest number

Lebanon

United Kingdom

China

Staff employed by the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario
Number of staff 2005 2006 2007
Involved in registration process

2.5

2.5

2.5

Involved in appeals process

1.5

1.5

1.5

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical radiation technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
Members Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
Total members1

5,937

360

35

428

6,760

Non-practising members

0

0

0

0

0

1 Refers to active members only.

Applicants processed by the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario in 2005

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical radiation technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2005 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

306

44

4

63

417

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members1

20

N/A

N/A

N/A

20

Applicants who became members

274

42

5

50

373

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence but were not issued a licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1 The CMRTO does not have retroactive data on the status of these applicants at the end of 2005 and 2006. Therefore, it has provided the correct data for those years, effective December 31, 2007.

Applicants processed by the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario in 2006

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical radiation technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2006 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

330

36

5

52

423

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members1

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

15

Applicants who became members

250

30

1

34

315

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence but were not issued a licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1 The CMRTO does not have retroactive data on the status of these applicants at the end of 2005 and 2006. Therefore, it has provided the correct data for those years, effective December 31, 2007.

Applicants processed by the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario in 2007

 

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical radiation technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2007 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

272

43

6

42

363

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members1

25

N/A

N/A

N/A

25

Applicants who became members

223

35

3

18

279

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence but were not issued a licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1 The CMRTO does not have retroactive data on the status of these applicants at the end of 2005 and 2006. Therefore, it has provided the correct data for those years, effective December 31, 2007.

9. SOURCES

College of Medical Radiation Technologists website: http://www.cmrto.org/home/default.asp. Last accessed: March 20, 2008.

College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario and Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. “Access to the Medical Radiation Technology Profession in Ontario”. Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration website. http://www.citizenship.gov.on.ca/. Last accessed: March 20, 2008.

Representatives of the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario met with staff of the Office of the Fairness Commissioner on November 26, 2007, to provide further information for this study.



[1] It is optional for an applicant to provide this documentation at the time of application; however, the applicant must provide evidence of meeting these requirements before a certificate of registration will be issued. For example, if an applicant’s language of instruction for the program in medical radiation technology was not in English or French, then he or she can provide proof of language fluency (TOEFL test) either at the time of application or later on in the registration process. Similarly, if an applicant is not a landed immigrant at the time of application to the CMRTO, he or she can provide such evidence later on in the registration process. This flexibility enables applicants to apply to the CMRTO and to have a decision on whether or not they are eligible for registration with the college before they decide to apply to immigrate to Canada.

[2] Applicants trained in Quebec must successfully complete the examination set by the Ordre des Technologues en Radiologie du Québec in the specialty for which they apply.