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Study of Registration Practices of the
COLLEGE OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGISTS OF ONTARIO, 2007

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION
  2. 2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Legislation
    2. b. Protected Titles
    3. c. Definition of the Profession
    4. d. Labour Market/Economic Trends
    5. e. New Developments Within the Profession
    6. f. Staffing
  3. 3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES
    1. a. Registration Requirements and Application Process
    2. b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals
    3. c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)
    4. d. Academic/Program Requirements
    5. e. Work Experience Requirements
    6. f. Examinations
    7. g. Language Requirements
    8. h. Fees
    9. i. Third Parties
    10. j. Typical Length of the Registration Process
    11. k. Accredited Programs
    12. l. Internal Review/Appeal Process
  4. 4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS
  5. 5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS
  6. 6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY
    1. a. Nature and Frequency of Communication
    2. b. Backlogs
    3. c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process
  7. 7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY
  8. 8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS
  9. 9. SOURCES

ISBN 978-1-4249-6458-1 [HTML English version]


1. INTRODUCTION

The Office of the Fairness Commissioner (OFC) undertook a study of registration practices of Ontario's regulated professions during the fall and winter of 2007–2008. The purpose of the study was to understand each regulated profession's 2007 registration practices and to establish baseline data and information to enable the OFC to measure progress as it fulfills its mandate under the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act, 2006.

This report reflects the registration practices of the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario as of December 31, 2007. Information in this report was gathered from:

The College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario also provided registration information and statistics for 2005, 2006 and 2007 through a standard spreadsheet designed by the OFC.

An analysis and summary of the findings for all of the regulated professions is contained in the OFC's Ontario’s Regulated Professions: Report on the 2007 Study of Registration Practices.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE REGULATORY BODY

a. Legislation

The College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario (CMLTO) operates in accordance with the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 and the Medical Laboratory Technology Act, 1991.

b. Protected Titles

Only persons registered with the CMLTO can use the title “medical laboratory technologist” (MLT) or hold themselves out to be medical laboratory technologists.

c. Definition of the Profession

According to the Medical Laboratory Technology Act, “The practice of medical laboratory technology is the performance of laboratory investigations on the human body or on specimens taken from the human body and the evaluation of the technical sufficiency of the investigations and their results.”

The CMLTO issues certificates of registration in General Medical Laboratory Technology (which includes the specialties of biochemistry, microbiology, hematology, transfusion science, (histology and phlebotomy), cytology, and clinical genetics technology (which includes the specialties of molecular genetics and cytogenetics).

Medical laboratory technologists perform sophisticated laboratory investigations on the human body or on specimens taken from the human body. They also evaluate the technical sufficiency of the investigations and their results. The results of these tests provide important information that doctors or other health care professionals need to make decisions about their patients’ health.

MLT professionals most often work in licensed laboratories, such as hospital labs, private (community) labs, and government labs, but they may also work in medical research, forensics, education, community health, and industry.

MLTs may also work in areas such as laboratory information management (using laboratory data to improve health care outcomes), laboratory management, or point of care testing (performance of laboratory tests outside of the laboratory).

There are many specialty areas in medical laboratory technology:

Biochemistry (Clinical Chemistry): the measurement of chemical constituents in blood and body fluids to detect chemicals, hormones, and/or drugs

Microbiology: the study of micro-organisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites

Hematology: the science dealing with the measurement and morphology of blood cells and blood forming tissues and with their physiology and pathology

Transfusion Science: the detection of blood types and cross-matching for transfusion (also called immunohematology or blood banking)

Histology: the preparation and study of tissue specimens for the detection of disease

Cytology: the study of cells, their origin, structure, function, and pathology

Genetics: the study of human chromosomes, DNA, and RNA from cells of body fluids and tissues to diagnose genetic diseases. This includes cytogenetics and molecular genetics.

Electron Microscopy: the preparation and study of tissues using highly magnified images

Phlebotomy: the taking of blood from a vein.

d. Labour Market/Economic Trends

Demand for MLTs is increasing because Canada’s growing and aging population requires more health services; new technologies are improving the ability to diagnose disease; and more Canadians have health care insurance that covers a wider range of services.

CMLTO registration does not guarantee employment as an MLT and entry-level positions may be contract or part-time. The CMLTO does not track information on employment opportunities, but it does have a job posting section on its website, under Communications.

According to the CMLTO Annual Report 2007, hospitals employ 67 per cent of MLTs, community (private) labs employ 13 per cent, public health labs employ 8 per cent, and other settings such as education, specimen collection centres, commercial companies, research, infertility labs, short-/long-term care and psychiatric care employ 4 per cent. The remaining 8 per cent are working outside Ontario or Canada, not working, self-employed or on maternity/paternity leave.

Seventy-five per cent of MLTs in Ontario are over age 41 and 38 per cent of MLTs are over age 51. The Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS) has predicted that 44 per cent of MLTs in Canada will be eligible to retire at 55 years of age by 2015.

e. New Developments Within the Profession

Until October 2005, the CMLTO required internationally educated applicants to have Canadian experience before they were permitted to write the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS) national certification examination. The CMLTO’s registration regulation has since been amended and the CSMLS now decides who is eligible to write the examination. This change has enabled internationally educated MLTs to proceed to the exam without Canadian experience if they are deemed to be eligible through the Prior Learning Assessment process (see section 3.a).

Regulation 682 of the Laboratory and Specimen Collection Centre Licensing Act allows the Director of Laboratory and Specimen Collection Centre Licensing to permit persons to practise as medical laboratory technologists despite their not belonging to the CMLTO and not meeting the CMLTO's entry-to-practice requirements. This dual regulatory structure is not consistent with the mandate of the CMLTO to protect the public. A person authorized by the Director is not subject to same the regulatory accountability or complaints and discipline processes as are members of the CMLTO. The CMLTO believes this provision should be removed from Regulation 682.

f. Staffing

The CMLTO staff consists of 10 full-time and four part-time employees. Three full time employees are involved in the registration process.

3. REGISTRATION PRACTICES

a. Registration Requirements and Application Process

An applicant is a person who submits an application to the CMLTO after he or she has met all registration requirements and has paid the application for assessment fee.

i. Basic Requirements for Registration

In order to register as an MLT in Ontario, applicants must:

ii. Steps in the Application Process for Internationally Educated Applicants

Step 1 – Apply to the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science for a Prior Learning Assessment (PLA).

The PLA determines whether the applicant’s theoretical and practical education and work experience are equivalent to those of Canadian-educated MLTs. All transcripts, letters, course content, and other documentation must be completed and submitted to the CSMLS before an application can be assessed. Applicants should send either a notarized copy of the certificate of qualification or a letter directly from the certifying body giving details of their certification and status.

Failure to provide necessary documents will delay the CSMLS Evaluation of Past Training and Experience. Files are held open for 12 months; after that time applicants must reapply.

Step 2 – PLA: English/French Fluency Test.

See Section 3.g.

Step 3 – PLA: Evaluation of Academic/Education Qualifications.

See Section 3.c.

Step 4 – PLA: CSMLS Evaluation of Past Training and Experience.

The CSMLS requires the same original documents and notarized copies/translations that the applicant sends to International Credential Evaluation Services (ICES) or World Education Services (WES) in Step 3. Applicants should ask their educational institutions and other organizations to send transcripts to both ICES or WES and to CSMLS. Original materials sent by applicants will be returned. Materials sent directly from institutions will be retained by the CSMLS.

To have their work experience evaluated, applicants should ask the director or technical supervisor of the laboratory where they worked to document their experience with a detailed outline of duties and responsibilities and of the scope and volume of testing performed by the applicant. This must be submitted directly to the CSMLS. Applicants should ask for this information to be sent to them as well.

Applicants must also fill out and submit the Personal Competency Rating Booklet for their discipline. They can download this booklet from www.csmls.org/english/pre_assessment.htm.

Applicants must provide proof of residency status in Canada. Applicants must send an official notarized confirmation to the CSMLS.

Applicants can add information to their file after the PLA has been completed, but only for 90 days. To do so, applicants must pay a supplemental documentation fee of $50 and indicate which additional documents should be assessed. A revised PLA report will be sent within 30 days.

Step 5 – Successful Completion (Pass) of the CSMLS National Certification Examination.

Step 6 – Apply for a CMLTO Practising Certificate of Registration

When the CSMLS has completed the PLA, it sends a report to the applicant, and this report is the only PLA the CMLTO will accept. The length of the PLA process varies from applicant to applicant. Applicants should contact the CSMLS directly for information on their specific case.

The average turnaround time for the PLA process, once all documentation has been received, is four weeks. The PLA report is valid for two years.

b. Documentation Required from Internationally Trained Individuals

i. Standard Documentation

The CSMLS requires the following information from internationally trained applicants in order to conduct a Prior Learning Assessment (PLA):

Applicants whose education is deemed by CSMLS to be equivalent to Canadian MLT education can apply to write the CSMLS examination. Eligibility to write the exam is determined by the CSMLS.

Applicants who pass the CSMLS exam and demonstrate active engagement in the MLT profession or successful completion of a CMLTO-approved refresher course can apply for membership with the CMLTO.

ii. Options for Applicants with Unavailable/Destroyed Documents

The CSMLS has its own policy to address this situation.

c. Credential Assessment (Third Party and/or Internal)

The CMLTO contracts with the CSMLS for the PLA process. This PLA is the only assessment accepted by the CMLTO. Internationally educated medical laboratory technologists and graduates from Canadian programs that are not CMA-accredited must complete a PLA. The PLA evaluates education and experience for equivalency to Canadian MLT education.

The CSMLS uses the services of International Credential Evaluation Services (ICES) and World Education Services (WES) to evaluate credentials earned outside of Canada.

d. Academic/Program Requirements

To be registered with the CMLTO, applicants must have evidence of successful completion of a Canadian diploma/degree in medical laboratory technology from a program approved by the CMLTO or provide proof of a PLA conducted by the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science that demonstrates equivalency to a Canadian MLT program.

During the PLA process, the CSMLS may require course work for the internationally trained medical laboratory technologists to be deemed equivalent to that of Canadian educated medical laboratory technologists. The CSMLS has a list of courses that it has approved for the PLA process. Many of the CSMLS-approved courses are also approved by the Registration Committee of the CMLTO, and several are available by distance education. Recently, the CMLTO cross-referenced CMLTO-approved courses with those approved by CSMLS. This process resulted in over 20 courses being added to the CMLTO’s approved list.

e. Work Experience Requirements

An applicant for membership with the CMLTO must show proof of active engagement (use of knowledge, skills and judgment as a medical laboratory technologist) in medical laboratory technology in the three years preceding the application. If the applicant has not been actively engaged in the practice of medical laboratory technology within this three-year period, he or she must show proof of successful completion of a CMLTO-approved refresher course in the three years preceding the application. The number of course hours required is dependent on the time away from practice of medical laboratory technology. A list of approved refresher courses by specialty can be accessed at www.cmlto.com under Registration/Approved Refresher Courses.

f. Examinations

The qualifying examination for membership in the CMLTO is the CSMLS examination, which is a national, standardized competency-based exam. The CMLTO has a contract with the CSMLS for this service. The CSMLS offers examinations in three areas: general medical laboratory technology, diagnostic cytology and clinical genetics. Applicants sit the examination that is applicable to their program.

CSMLS examinations are offered in February, June and October each year across the country and are based on the competency profile contained in “Competencies Expected of an Entry-Level Technologist”, which can be accessed on the CSMLS website, www.csmls.org, under Certification. CSMLS examinations use a multiple-choice format.

The CMLTO does not provide assistance or preparatory materials to applicants taking CSMLS examinations. Applicants should visit the CSMLS website to obtain an Examination Handbook and application. The booklet describes the exam and contains sample questions and answer sheets.

In 2007, the opportunity to write the CSMLS examination was granted to non-residents of Canada, but they must come to Canada to sit the examination.

Applicants have three chances to pass the exam. Applicants who do not pass the exam after three attempts must submit a learning plan and re-establish their eligibility to take the exam.

Eligibility to write the CSMLS clinical genetics examination requires education in both cytogenetics and molecular genetics. Most countries in the world do not teach both specialties in one program. The Registration Committee of the CMLTO may grant an exemption for the examination part of the registration regulation when an applicant has been educated in only one of the specialties. Such cases are examined on an individual basis.

g. Language Requirements

The evaluation of English or French fluency is part of the PLA process conducted by CSMLS.

Language proficiency is determined as part of the credential evaluation completed by ICES or WES. If the credential evaluation states any language of instruction other than English and/or French, the PLA applicant must meet the CSMLS language proficiency requirements.

If the PLA applicant studied in English and another language, the credential evaluation report will indicate both languages of instruction and the client still needs to meet the language proficiency requirement. If the program was offered in multiple languages, but the PLA applicant’s language of instruction was exclusively English, this must be verified by their institution. This additional information should be submitted to the credential evaluation service and the CSMLS in the form of a separate letter accompanying the official academic documents.

The CSMLS will accept one of the following as proof of language proficiency:

Option Fluency Test Minimum Score TSE-P Test Required

1

TOEFL Paper-based

580

Yes, minimum score 50

2

TOEFL Computer-based

230

Yes, minimum score 50

3

TOEFL Internet-based
Reading
Writing
Listening
Speaking

90 (total)
21
21
21
24

No

4

CanTEST
Reading
Writing
Listening
Speaking

 
Band 4
Band 4
Band 4
Band 4

Yes, minimum score 50

5

IELTS – Academic (A)
Reading
Writing
Listening
Speaking

7.0 for all

No

6

IELTS – Professional (P)
Reading
Writing
Listening
Speaking

7.0 for all

No

The applicant’s score report must be sent to CSMLS directly from the testing organization.

After January 1, 2008, the CSMLS will begin accepting the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) mentioned above (options 5 and 6) for a pilot project of six months.

h. Fees

The fees listed below do not include GST.

ICES Assessment Fee (Comprehensive Evaluation Report)

$225

Extra copy ICES Report for CSMLS

$10

WES Assessment Fee (Course by Course Evaluation Report and languages of instruction)

$200

Extra copy WES report for CSMLS

$20

CSMLS assessment application and information package sent through the mail (download is free)

$25

CSMLS Prior Learning Assessment – Evaluation of Past Training and Experience

$325

CMLTO application assessment fee

$150

CMLTO annual registration fee

$250

CSMLS examination fee (member of CSMLS)

General Exam: $450

Genetics or Cytology: $675

CSMLS examination fee (non-member of CSMLS)

General Exam: $600

Genetics and Cytology: $900

CSMLS examination fee (non-resident of Canada – writing examination in Canada) [2]

General Exam: $1,350 Genetics or Cytology: $1,800

Additional Fees

Internationally trained applicants are required to pay the cost of the language proficiency test and translation fees.

i. Third Parties

Name of Third Party Relationship to Regulatory Body

Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS)

Performs the Prior Learning Assessment and administers national certification exam. CSMLS uses ICES or WES for the evaluation of academic and educational qualifications.

CSMLS Council on National Certification (CNC)

The Deputy Registrar at the CMLTO is the Ontario voting member on the CNC. The CNC is responsible for policies related to the PLA process and the certification process of the CSMLS. All provinces in Canada are represented on the CNC.

Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences

The Access and Options Program provides theory review courses, simulated clinical and clinical training placements on a part-time basis, as part of a bridging program.

Mohawk College

The Medical Laboratory Technology for Internationally Educated Technologists Program provides theory and practical courses, simulated clinical and clinical training placement on a full-time basis, as part of a bridging program. Individual courses may be taken.

Language Testing Services (TOEFL, CanTEST and IELTS)

Administers English language proficiency tests

j. Typical Length of the Registration Process

The CMLTO’s average processing time for complete applications is four business days. Most applications do not have to be referred to the Registration Committee of the CMLTO.

If an application is referred to the Registration Committee (for example, because there is uncertainty as to whether the applicant meets the registration requirements), it will take longer to process. The time for processing is dependent on when the completed application is received at the CMLTO office and the meeting schedule of the Registration Committee. The Committee normally meets every two months. A decision from the Committee is mailed within four weeks of the meeting date; however, the CMLTO strives to mail decisions within five to eight business days.

Once an applicant is approved for registration, he or she must pay the annual registration fee within 35 days to become a member. Once the annual fee is paid and the member receives the certificate of registration, he or she may practise medical laboratory technology in Ontario.

k. Accredited Programs

The following colleges/universities in Ontario and Canada offer programs in medical laboratory technology that have been accredited by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA). These programs are offered in three categories: clinical genetics, cytotechnology and medical laboratory technology.

Medical Laboratory Technology:

Ontario
Cambrian College of Applied Arts and Technology, Sudbury
St. Clair College of Applied Arts and Technology — Diploma Portion of Concurrent Diploma/Degree Program, Windsor
St. Clair College of Applied Arts and Technology — Diploma Program, Windsor
St. Lawrence College Saint-Laurent, Kingston
Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, Toronto
University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa

Alberta
Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, Edmonton
Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Calgary
Universityof Alberta, Edmonton

British Columbia
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby
College of New Caledonia, Prince George Campus, Prince George (Registered for CMA Accreditation.[3] Visit tentatively scheduled for September 2009)

Manitoba
Red River College of Applied Arts, Science and Technology, Winnipeg

New Brunswick
Collège communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick — Dieppe/Université de Moncton/Régie régionale de la santé Beauséjour, Hôpital régional Dr Georges-L. Dumont, Moncton/Dieppe
New Brunswick Community College — Saint John campus

Newfoundland
College of the North Atlantic, Prince Philip Drive campus, St. John's

Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia Community College, Halifax (Status: Registered. Visit tentatively scheduled for January 2009.)

Quebec
Cégep de Chicoutimi
Cégep de Rimouski
Cégep de Saint-Hyacinthe
Cégep de Saint-Jérôme
Cégep de Sainte-Foy
Cégep Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu
Collège de Rosemont, Montreal
Collège de Sherbrooke
Collège Shawinigan
Dawson College, Montreal

Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon

Clinical Genetics:

Ontario
Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, Toronto

British Columbia
British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby

Cytotechnology:

Ontario
Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, Toronto

Alberta
Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, Edmonton

British Columbia
British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver

Manitoba
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority — Health Sciences Centre

Nova Scotia
Queen Elizabeth II/Dalhousie School of Health Sciences — Diploma and Degree Options, Halifax

Quebec
Collège de Rosemont, Montreal

Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon

Program offerings are subject to change. For a current listing, go to www.cmlto.com under Registration/Courses and Programs. This links to www.cma.ca.

l. Internal Review/Appeal Process

If an applicant clearly does not meet all of the registration requirements, the application will be referred to the Registration Committee of the CMLTO for review. (The CMLTO issues a Non-Practising Certificate if the applicant meets all of the registration requirements except active engagement in the practice of medical laboratory technology or has not completed a CMLTO-approved refresher course.)

The Registration Committee is composed of nine members: six professional members (three from the CMLTO Council and three MLTs who are not Council members) and three public members. The public members are appointed to the CMLTO Council by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.

If the application is not approved by the Registration Committee, a document outlining the Committee’s decision and reasons is mailed to the applicant. Applicants seeking further clarification should call the CMLTO office. If an applicant submits additional documentation after the decision has been rendered, the application may be referred back to the Registration Committee for further review.

As a final option, a decision of the Registration Committee to deny registration may be appealed to the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB). Information about appealing a Registration Committee decision is sent to the applicant. Wherever possible, the CMLTO and the Registration Committee will attempt to resolve a disagreement internally before referring an appeal to the HPARB.

Information about appeals of registration decisions is not currently available on the CMLTO’s website.

Under the provisions of the Regulated Health Professions Act, the applicant is entitled to all the information and a copy of each document the college has that is relevant to their application. If the applicant decides to appeal to the HPARB for a review or hearing, the college is required to make a submission containing all documents on which the decision was based.

The CSMLS has an appeal process relating to its credential assessment decisions. A request for an appeal of PLA decision must be received no more than 45 days after the assessment letter was issued. A request for manual verification of the CSMLS examination results must be received within four weeks of the results being released. There are fees for both of these reviews.

4. BRIDGING PROGRAMS

Two educational institutions have set up programs that help landed immigrants who have a PLA that is equivalent to a Canadian education become certified and enter the health care workforce in Ontario.

5. MUTUAL RECOGNITION AGREEMENTS

In accordance with the Agreement on Internal Trade, Chapter 7 (Labour Mobility), the CMLTO has a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) with three of the provinces that regulate medical laboratory technology in Canada — Alberta, Saskatchewan and New Brunswick.

This agreement was also endorsed by the provinces and territories that do not regulate medical laboratory technology and by the CSMLS. All parties are working on revisions to the MRA that will include the newly regulated provinces (Manitoba and Nova Scotia) and Quebec.

6. APPLICANTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH REGULATORY BODY

a. Nature and Frequency of Communication

Applicants and potential applicants are encouraged to contact the CMLTO office at any time. The average number of interactions per year is 1,500. Approximately 56 per cent are phone calls, 41 per cent are e-mails and 3 per cent are onsite consultation visits.

b. Backlogs

The CMLTO does not normally have a backlog of applicants. However, during three peak periods (March, July/August and November/December) there may be a backlog due to the volume of applications received.

c. Complaints Regarding the Registration Process

Complaints regarding the registration process are handled by the registration department on a case-by-case basis, or they may be sent directly to the Registrar and/or Executive Director of the CMLTO.

7. CHANGES SINCE THE 2005 SURVEY

The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration conducted a survey in 2005 to collect information about occupational regulatory bodies in Ontario. Since that time, the CMLTO has updated its career map, most recently in May 2007.

The CMLTO collaborates with bridging programs to identify or modify programs/courses for internationally trained individuals. In addition, the college has developed instructions to assist internationally trained individuals in completing the application for assessment and developed a Frequently Asked Questions document and posted it on its website, under Registration.

8. REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND STATISTICS

Definitions used in these tables:

Alternative class of licence: a class of licence that enables its holder to practise with limitations; additional registration requirements must be met in order to be fully licensed. The College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario grants licences with terms, conditions and limitations to applicants who are not fully licensed.

Applicant: an individual who has applied to start the process for entry to the profession.

Applicant actively pursuing licensing: an applicant who had some contact with the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario within the year specified. The CMLTO does not record figures for these applicants.

Inactive applicant: an applicant who had no contact with the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario within the year specified. The CMLTO does not record figures for these applicants.

Member: an individual who is currently able to use the protected title or professional designation of “medical laboratory technologist.”

Languages in which application information materials are available
Language 2005 2006 2007
English

Yes

Yes

Yes

French

Yes

Yes

Yes

Other(s)      
Countries where internationally educated applicants were initially trained in medical laboratory technology1
Applications received 2005 2006 2007
Largest number

Philippines

India

India/Philippines2

Second-largest number

India

Philippines

Third-largest number

Pakistan

Fourth-largest number

United States

Fifth-largest number      

1 Only countries from which more than five applications were received are included in this table.

2 Same number of applicants.

Staff employed by the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario
Number of staff 2005 2006 2007
Involved in registration process1

3

3

3

Involved in appeals process2

1

1

1

1 Includes the Deputy Registrar, who is also responsible for other operational issues.

2 The Deputy Registrar prepares documents for the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (if applicable).

Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical laboratory technology
(before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)1
Members Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
Total members

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Non-practising members

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1 Because before 2005 the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario did not track where its members had been trained, there are no available figures for this table.

Applicants processed by the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario in 2005
  Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical laboratory technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2005 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

152

22

7

128

309

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

0

0

2

2

Applicants who became members

149

22

6

122

299

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence1 but were not issued a licence

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1642

1 Licence with terms, conditions and limitations.

2 Total number of persons granted a licence with terms, conditions and limitations (breakdown by origin not available). After October 25, 2005 the college no longer issued a temporary class of registration.

Applicants processed by the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario in 2006
  Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical laboratory technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2006 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

162

39

2

47

250

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

0

0

0

2

2

Applicants who became members

156

31

2

30

219

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence1 but were not issued a licence

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence1

2

0

0

2

4

1 Licence with terms, conditions and limitations. After October 25, 2005, the college no longer issued a temporary class of registration.

Applicants processed by the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario in 2007
  Jurisdiction where members were initially trained in medical laboratory technology (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
In 2007 (Jan. 1 to Dec. 31) Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International TOTAL
New applications received

198

25

0

79

302

Applicants actively pursuing licensing

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inactive applicants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members

1

0

0

0

1

Applicants who became members

186

21

0

70

277

Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence1 but were not issued a licence

0

0

0

0

0

Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence1

0

0

0

0

0

1 Licence with terms, conditions and limitations.

9. SOURCES

Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS) website: http://www.csmls.org/. Last accessed: April 10, 2008.

College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario website: http://www.cmlto.com/. Last accessed: April 10, 2008.

College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario and Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. “Access to the Medical Laboratory Technology Profession in Ontario.” Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration website: http://www.citizenship.gov.on.ca/. Last accessed: April 10, 2008.

Representatives of the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Ontario met with staff of the Office of the Fairness Commissioner on December 21, 2007, to provide further information for this study.



[1] The programs approved by the CMLTO are the Canadian Medical Association (CMA)-accredited programs. The CMA accredited programs include a structured clinical component in the third year of studies and this clinical portion will be considered as an active engagement in the practice of medical laboratory technology for graduates of a CMA-accredited program.

[2] Costs are higher if applicant to examination is not a member of CSMLS and is not a resident of Canada. PLA applicants can become members of the CSMLS in the associate category.

[3] Registered means that an unaccredited program has registered for accreditation and a visit has been scheduled pending a successful Phase I review, or the assessment is underway. The projected date of a visit may be subject to change.